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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM             THEY DIED FOR ENGLAND                
                                           
With the arrival of the Derby Recruits the camp became again a scene of busy activity. Then came the Convalescents, both Imperial and Canadian, and part of the camp was taken over by the Canadian Government.   Then the town assumed almost the appearance of a city in Scotland, so many of the Canadian soldiers being in the National dress of the Northern Kingdom.   rang out their glad tidings of the Armistice.   It seemed the fair promise of a New Era, the dawn of which, alas, is not yet.  
  But in Shoreham, as elsewhere, there was many a glad homecoming. The happy re-union of wife and husband, parents and sons, alas there were many desolate homes, in which there could be no rejoicing.   Homes from whence lads in all the freshness and beauty of youth, or men of riper years, had gone forth to that tremendous struggle, and to which husband, father, son or brother returned not again.  
A remarkable service was held in New Shoreham Church at the Jubilee of the Federation of the Dominion of Canada, The General Officer Commanding, attended by his staff, fifty officers and one hundred men, representing various units in camp drawn from all parts of Canada, were present.   The Canadian Colours, battle-worn from the front, were borne in the opening procession and the Canadian National Anthem, " 0 Canada," sung by a congregation which overflowed to the Churchyard.    
                                 
      They are a part of England's splendid story,                
      To fight for her, went forth, their all to give ; And on the fields of war, shell-torn and gory,            
        Paid with their lives, the price, that she might live.        
                                 
      They did not heed the joyful acclamation                  
      Nor hear the cheering when the fight was done; No welcome home, no loving salutation;          
Their Majesties, King George and Queen Mary, visited Shoreham on the 3rd November, 1916. Though purely a military visit, on the arrival of the Royal train, a considerable number of the inhabitants of the town and neighbourhood, gave the King and Queen a hearty welcome as they entered a motor car and sped along Buckingham Road.   The whole distance from the station to the camp was lined on either side by Canadian soldiers, standing at attention.   At the Triangle Plantation, close to the entrance to Buckingham Park, the Royal car stopped and the Colonel in Command of the Canadian troops was presented to their Majesties. The King and Queen alighted at the entrance to the Steyning Union and visited part of the Infirmary reserved as a Military Hospital.   The Royal Standard was flying at the camp and their Majesties walked up the hill to the Headquarters, from whence they watched a detachment of men go through physical exercises to the music of a band and in pouring rain.   The weather left much to be desired.   An inspection was made of the arrangements for the men's recreation, of the " Welcome Hut " and the Camp Church.   The Queen took shelter in one of the Institute Rooms with her lady-in-waiting and attendants. The Royal visit terminated about 1.15.                
        Their lives had ended, ere their cause had won.            
                                 
      Shoreham will hold their names in sacred keeping And generations yet unborn shall read;            
      They fought for Freedom, not for glory seeking And died for England in her hour of need.              
                A. F. W. EADE.    
                                 
  The names of the men of Shoreham-by-Sea who laid down their lives in the Great War:  
                                 
    THE MEMORIAL IN THE CHURCH OF ST. MARY.      
  Oswald F. G. Ball, 2nd Lieut. - George Banfield, Stoker - Albert Barnes, Pte. - Alfred E. Bingham, Gunr. - Frank W. Bish, Pte. - Herbert G. Bishop, Pte. - Benjamin R. Black, Pte. - Ernest Bunton, Lee.-Cpl. - Frederick   Burstow,   Cyclist - Cyril   C.   Carley,   Pte. - A. Wesley Chambers, Sgt. - Henry V. Christmas, Signaller - Norris W. Clevett, Lee.-Cpl. - Victor J. H. Coles, Pte. - Thomas A. Coleman, Pte. - Cecil H. S. Collis, Signaller - George H. Cooke, Pte. - L. Davis - Frederick Dearing, 1st A.M. - Charles A. T. Dorey, Sgt. - Charles S. Dorey, Rfle. - Charles Dyer, Sapper - Percy Earthey, Pte. - Thomas F. R. English, Pte. - Henry E. Fairs, Lce.-Cpl. - George F. Felton, Pte. - John E. Gasston, 1st class Stoker - George W. Gearing, Leading Seaman - Frank L. Goodchild, Pte. - Bertram G. Green, Pte. - Douglas W. Green, Pte. - Brooking A. J. Harrison, Lee.-Cpl. - Garland B. Harrison, Pte. - George T. Hart, Pte. - James Henson, Lee.-Cpl. - Walter J. Hitchman, Sgt. - Albert V. A. Hooker, Rifleman - Gordon E. Hughes, Sgt. - Joseph Hunter, Pioneer -
           
His Majesty the King again visited Shoreham Camp 26th March, 1918. It was at a time when the outlook grew darker and ever darker.   The submarines daily added to the awful toll of sunken ships.   But "'tis darkest before the dawn," and dawn came with that grey November morning when the bells  
                                           
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002