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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM             CRICKET AND FOOTBALL      
                               
Topical allusions were often introduced, and an "Indian Mutiny" version was much in favour at Shoreham about the middle of the last century. At the close of the play, the company in turn sang modern ditties, after which the actors were invited to partake of Christmas cheer.         OLD SHOREHAM CRICKET GROUND.    
      GENTLEMEN V. PLAYERS OF SUSSEX. ON THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, JUNE 17 and 18, 1858. FOR THE PENEFIT OF THE PLAYERS. ADMISSION TICKET FOR THE Two DAYS-ONE SHILLING.  
There was formerly at the " Red Lion," Old Shoreham, a custom called " the Bushel," which was observed on New Year's Day. A bushel corn measure decorated with flowers, leaves, and green paper, was filled with beer, which, frothing up, made it appear like a huge cauliflower. From this all comers might drink free. The beer was ladled out with a pint mug and drunk from glasses. There was a regular chairman, and the man who ladled out the. liquor was tailed " the baler," and the latter had the privilege of drinking from the measure itself.   How far back this custom dated is uncertain, but it was duly observed on January 1st, 1883, and it was then known to go back to the beginning of the century.        
                     
  Much might be written of present day sport.   The Shoreham Cricket Club flourishes under the presidency of Major G. F. Sexton, of " Tipperary."   The liberal response of that gentleman to all that concerns local sport and the social life of the town, is greatly appreciated, but above all, his kindly and practical interest on behalf of " demobbed" soldiers is well known.   A " Comrades of the Great War " Cricket Club, is in course of formation.
  Local Football does not arouse quite the same enthusiasm as in by-gone years, when some notable matches were played in the Oxon Field.-Possibly because so many now find their way to the Goldstone Ground at Hove. The town numbers among her sons, Albert Edward Longstaff, one of the most clever and popular players in the Brighton and Hove Albion team.
Martin Richard Cobbett, in "Wayfaring Notions," mentions " good Mrs. Cuddington at the little Inn facing Old Shoreham Bridge." He says :-" I always pay that road-side hostelry a visit out of respect for the proprietor and better half ; also to show friends the massive wood tables a former village blacksmith used to raise to the ceiling-a low one mind-with his brawny arms.   The said arm's muscles must have been strong as iron bands if he performed the feat, as tradition asserts, with a palm under each."  
  Indoor recreations include a Social Club held at St. Mary's Hall, there is a Beach Club at Bungalow Town, and the Susses County Aero Club at New Salts. There are three popular Picture Houses, the Coliseum, the Bijou, and the Star.
  An Ex-Service Men's Club has recently been erected at Old Shoreham, and was opened on the 19th July, 1921, by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught.
           
The faint echo of a former custom, is to be heard in the name still sometimes given to the hill, whose steep sides slope to the river valley at Old Shoreham. It was to " Good Friday Hill " on the afternoon of that day, in years gone by, that the school children and others, marched in procession to take part in various games and amusements.   Hard-boiled eggs, dyed various colours, such as yellow, violet and pink, were much in evidence at this time and may have been a survival of the " Pace eggs " once so universal at Eastertide.   These eggs, and also oranges, were rolled like bowls, down the steep sides of " Good Friday Hill." In dealing with sport it behoves the present writer to tread warily. He knows little of Football and less of Cricket, but both these games flourish at Shoreham.  
  The Masonic Lodge of St. Mary de Haura, holds its meetings at the Town Hail. The Dolphin Lodge, meeting at the Inn of that name from 1766 to 1773, is the earliest record of Freemasonry in the town.   The Harmony Lodge of Freemasons established first at Chichester in 1790, was removed to the Fountain Inn, Shoreham, in 1800, and became extinct in 1832.   The Burrell Lodge, named after the Provincial Grind Master of Sussex, the late Sir Walter Wyndham Burrell, Bart., M.P. for Shoreham, was consecrated at the Old Town Hall, East Street, Shoreliam, in 1879.   It was subsequently moved to the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, and still meets there.
By the courtesy of "Leather Hunter," of the Sussex Dai,'y News, the copy of the original card of admission to a Cricket Match played at Old Shoreham in the 'fifties, is appended :  
                     
                               
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002