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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM              
                     
Knepp Castle, the family seat of the Burrells, was destroyed by fire in January, 1904. The large and valuable library, many priceless manuscripts, and nearly the whole cf the collection of pictures-several by old masters and including some by Holbeinperished in the flames. The Castle was afterwards re-built.            
    CHAPTER XV.  
           
Sir Robert Loder, Bart, J.P., D.L. Born 7th August, 1823. Married (1847) Maria Georgiana, fourth daughter of Hans Busk and grand-daughter of Sir Hans Busk. High Sheriff, 1877. Elected M.P. for New Shoreham, 1880. Created a baronet 27th July, 1887. Died at Beach House, Worthing, 27th May, 1888. Succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Edmund Giles Loder, 2nd Bart., of Leonardslee, Horsham, who died 14th April, 1920. Sir Edmund's only son was killed in the Great War, and the title therefore passed to his grandson, a child of six years of age.            
  COACHING DAYS-THE CARRIER AND HIS CART-OPENING OF THE RAILWAY SHOREHAM IN THE 'FIFTIES-THE SWISS GARDENS--SOME OLD CUSTOMS.
                     
            LESS than two hundred years ago, a journey to London or any distant city was a slow and painful process, especially in winter time, when the roads were almost impassable, and going, to say the least of it, was " heavy." It is on record that the Shoreham to London coach, " frequently made use of a pair of oxen to drag it over some of the worst stretches of the road."
Sir Robert Loder's fifth son, Gerald Walter Erskine Loder, Esq., represented Brighton in the Conservative interest from 1889 till 1905.  
  According to an advertisement which appeared in the Times of August 22nd, 1793, a coach left London for Shoreham twice a week, and there was a coach from Bath and Bristol every, day.
           
            In the year 1800, the Bath, Bristol, Chichester and Portsmouth Post Coach set out from the Old Ship, Brighton, every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday morning at 8 o'clock, passing through Shoreham, Arundel, Southampton, Salisbury, &c., and returned on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. At this time and subsequently, the Shoreham Mail, though made up at Brightonevery evening before 7 o'clock, did not "set out" till early the next morning, with letters for Shoreham and Worthing; but in 1805, it " set out " from Brighton, " after the arrival of the London Mail."
                     
            About the year 1815 an accident at the Sussex Pad, by which a gentleman lost his life, was solely attributable to the racing of two coaches. One of the coachmen admitted at the inquest that he had received orders " to get in first, though he should lose a horse."
                     
            The great snowstorm of Christmas, 1836, sadly interfered with coaching. The Gloucester Mail, instead of reaching Brighton on Sunday, was not heard of until after noon on Monday, and then could get no further than Shoreham, the bags being sent on by the Worthing Mail Cart.
            Both the Fountain and Star Inns were well-known posting houses.   In the 'fifties the Star was conducted by George Cross, a survivor of the old coaching days.   He had been a coachman,
                     
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002