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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM       SIR ANTHONY DE ANE  
                     
When the Earl of Ormonde, during the Protectorate, paid a visit to England in 1658 with the object of preparing for the return of Charles II., he was accompanied through Suffolk by Dr. Quartermain and hearing that " Cromwell was on his track " he was conducted into Susses and to Shoreham by the Doctor. Thence he embarked and returned to the King.   born circa 1638 and was elder son of Anthony Deane, mariner of Harwich, whose will (P.C.C. 227 Pell) was proved 1659. But in an exemplification of arms and grant of a crest made to Sir Anthony, 1683, he is described as " son of Anthony Deane, of London, gent., and grandson of Anthony Deane of Gloucester." (East Anglian N.S., iii.-147).
Pepys, under date 24th May, 1660, writes : " Up and made myself as fine as I could with the lining stockings and wide canons that I bought the other day at Hague. Extraordinary press of noble company and great mirth all the day. There dined with me in my cabin, Dr. Earle and Mr. Hollis, the King's Chaplains, Dr. Scarborough, Dr. Quartermain and Dr. Clarke, Physicians ; Mr. Darcy and Mr. Fox (both very fine gentlemen) the King's servants, where we had brave discourse."   An Anthony Deane of Gloucester (presumably the same as above matriculated as poor scholar at Bradgates Hall, Oxford, 18th June, 1610, aged 14, and was described as " son of Edward Deane, of Pinnock, Gloucester."
  Richard Deane (1610-1653), the Regicide, was also a son of Edward Deane, of Pinnock (see Memorial to Anne, widow of Edward Deane, in Buckingham Church) and used the same arms as his name-sake, Sir Richard Deane, Lord Mayor of London, 1628, and is presumed to have been a relation-possibly a grandnephew. The Lord Mayor was a son of George Deane, of Dunmow, Essex. The Regicide had some connection with Essex for he left his estate at Hornchurch in that county to his sister Mary, widow of Dru Sparrow, Secretary to the Generals at sea, killed in action, 18th February, 1652.
On the decease of Sir Herbert Springett, William Quartermain was elected Member for New Shoreham, 13 Charles II., 1661. The Doctor seems to have been the unlucky possessor of sea.washed lands, for the State Papers for 6th November, 1664, contain a petition from him stating that 300 acres of land called Gatcombe Haven near Portsmouth had been recovered from the sea at too great a cost and asking for another grant of land, the cultivation of which would enable him to re-imburse himself for his loss.  
  Sir Anthony appears to have borne the same arms with but a slight difference of tincture (the chevron being sable instead of gules) as Sir Richard Deane, the Lord Mayor-Argent, on a chevron sable, between three Cornish choughs ppr. as many crosses pattee or, and his crest was-on a wreath argent and sable, the stern of one of His Majesty's first-rate ships called the " Royal Charter " in natural colours, viz., lower counter and buttocks sable, stempost proper, second counter, galleries, uprights, and taffrail or.
           
He seems to have been twice married, his second wife (whom he married either at St. Margaret's, Westminster, or in the Abbey itself, in 1662) being Mary, daughter of Sir Thomas Dyke, of Horeham, co. Sussex. Dr. Quarterinain was buried in St. Martin's in the Fields, 11th June, 1667. His decease occasioned a New Election at Shoreham 24th October, 1667, when John Fagge, Esq., was elected. (Foster's Alumni, Ox. (1500-1714) 111, 1225.   Notes and Queries 11 S. viii. 370-470).  
  This crest was evidenth, an allusion to Sir Anthony's eminence as a ship-builder. He began life in the dockyard at Woolwich and with the assistance of his friend, Samuel Pepys, the Diarist, obtained 15th October, 1664, the appointment of master shipwright of Harwich, and of Portsmouth, 1668.   In connection with the duties of his office, we find him writing June 6th, 1669, to the Navy Commissioners that he "had been to Shoreham, Arundel, kind Pulborough, about timber." Both Pepys and Evelyn bear testimony to the beauty of his draughtsmanship and modelling, and the former was never weary of acknowledging his obligation to Deane for initiating him into the many mysteries of " shipwrightry." He was the inventor of a cannon
           
24 Oct.,   1667   John Fagge, Esq., vice William Quartermain, Esq., -M.D., deceased.  
11 Feb.,      1672-3 Henry Goreing, junn, Esq., vice John Fagge,,    Esq., deceased.  
24 Oct.   16 7 8   Sir Anthony Deane,Knt., vice Edward Blaker, Esq., deceased.  
           
The descent and date of birth of Sir Anthony Deane, Knt., one of the most accomplished ship-builders of his time and an eminent public servant, are still a matter of doubt. A writer in the Dictionary of National Biography states that he was  
                     
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Revised 27 February 2002