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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM                      
          THE MEMBERS FOR NEW SHOREHAM        
                             
before the Election Sir Cecil withdrew and the Hon. C. IV. Wyndham was returned.                    
  subsequent Elections hustings were erected, sometimes in East Street near the churchyard, and more latterly in the High Street. On one occasion this work had been performed in a somewhat " jerry-built " manner and gave the mischievous shipyard apprentices a good opportunity for practical joking. Having passed some stout ropes round the erection they gave a " long pull and a strong pull," with the result that polling-clerk, voters, and others were shortly struggling together, sorting themselves out from the wreckage.
At the General Election in 1796, Sir Cecil Bishopp again offered himself in opposition to Sir Harry Goring, who retiring previously to the day of Election, Sir Cecil was returned in his place.  
In 1802, Sir Cecil was again returned with Sir Timothy Shelley, Bart., who succeeded Mr. Wyndham. At the next Election, in 1806, Sir Cecil again came forward; Sir Charles Merrik Burrell, Bart. also offered himself, and, on the 30th October, Sir Cecil retired and Sir Charles Merrik Burrell and Sir Timothy Shelley became the Members.  
  Formerly it was the custom for the newly-elected Members to stand with head uncovered, on the stone, while the result of the poll was declared. This stone is let into the pavement at the eastern end of the Market Place in front of " Stone House " -probably so named from this circumstance-and, although used for the ceremony at Election time, it was not, we think, placed there for that express purpose, and an element of mystery surrounds its origin.
The Election of June, 1826, for the Rape of Bramber and the Borough of Shoreham, with its record of extravagant and lavish payments, shows that although bribery by direct money payment had presumably been abolished, indirectly it was still rampant.  
At this Election, Sir Charles Merrik Burrell, Bart., Henry Howard, Esq., and E. Burtenshaw Sugden, Esq., were the three candidates for the two seats. The last-named gentleman was an eminent lawyer. The result at the close of the poll was :   Burrell, 865; Howard, 645; Sugden, 483-being the return of one Conservative and one Liberal.  
  On account of the electors being so scattered, Shoreham with four other constituencies, was made an exception to the clause in the Reform Act of 1832, which provides, " it shall not be lawful to pay any money on account of the conveyance of any voter to the poll." At the same time the places for polling were fixed at New Shoreham and Cowfold. By the Redistribution of Seats Act, 1885, Shoreham, after returning members to Parliament for 590 years, lost the direct representation altogether and became merged in the 1NEd or Lewes Division of the County of Sussex. This arrangement has recently been revised.   The town is now included in the Horsham and Worthing Parliamentary Division and so voted at the late General Election.
The Election cost these gentlemen nearly £6,000. Of this sum £707 found its way to the "Fountain Inn," and in addition, an item of £44 18s. l Id. "previous to election " and £32 10s. for the "waiters and ostlers of the `Fountain.' " The "Royal George" netted £384, the " King's Head " £215, and " The Schooner" £120. There was also an item of £65 " for hire of hand."  
The list of bills incurred atWorthing on account of this Shoreham Election came to over £1,000 ; while the amount paid for counsel, agents, and hustings, was but a few pounds short of £2,800.  
                   
  26   1298   Godfrey atte Curt   Roger le Wake  
This outpouring of money is referred to in a letter dated December 8th, 1826, requesting payment of £139 "for wines supplied during the Election." The writer of the letter says " as the period for petitioning has expired, I presume it will not be long before the bills are paid, they begin to be very clamourous at Shoreham."                    
  29   1300-1 Roger de Beauchamp Richard de Bokyngeham
  30   130.'3   Henry de Burne   Roger de Beauchamp
  33   1304-:5 Richard Serle   Simon Iveny      
    l Edward II.   1307   Richard Must   Richard Serle      
The practice of holding the Elections in the church was discontinued after 1826, mainly through the influence of the Rev. Z. H. Biddulph, Vicar, who doubtless felt that such proceedings were quite unsuited to the sacred character of the building. At     2   1309   John Virley   John Frewyn      
    5   1311   John Virley   John Frewyn      
    7   1313   Henry de Bourne   William de Pevense
  12   1319   John Loute   John Baudefait    
  19   1325   William Vyvyan   Thomas Moraunt  
                             
    214             215          

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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002