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    THE STORY OF SHOREHAM                    
                             
1900, succeeding the older Chapel in New Road, now the meeting place of the Salvation Army.                
The late General Booth received a very cordial reception from the members of the Urban District Council and inhabitants of the town when he passed through Shoreham a few years ago. Some who were present in the crowded High Street on that occasion may have recalled the earlier days of the Salvation Army in Shoreham. In former times a somewhat rough element, known as the "skeleton army," often molested those who were followers of the General's teaching.                
      CHAPTER XIV.    
               
  PARLIAMENTARY HISTORY-PAYMENT TO MENIBERS IN EARLY TIMES --EIGHTEENTH CENTURY BRIBERY AND CORRUPTION-El XTRAVAGANCO AT ELECTIONS-LIST OF THE DIEMBERS FOR NEW SHOREHAM-BIO"GRAPHICAL NOTES.
               
    In the 23rd year of the reign of Edward I., Roger de Beauchamp and Thomas Pontoyse were summoned to represent the town of New Shoreham in the great Council of the Nation.  
                   
  THE CATHOLIC CHURCH OF ST. PETER        
        During the Edwardian period there existed a system of payment to Members for their services. In the case of a Borough the sum of two shillings daily was chargeable upon the inhabitants for each burgess who represented it.   Thus, in 1335, when Robert Puffare, by order of the King, " came to London in Mid-Lent to inform the King and his Council on the state of the shipping," the bailiffs of Shoreham were ordered to pay the expenses of his journey to and from London and during his sojourn in the City at the rate of two shillings per day. On November 30th, 1355, there was a writ for the same rate of payment per day for nineteen days, for the expenses of John Bernard and Walter Bailiff of Shoreham, and in May, 1357, the same rate of payment for Walter Woxebrugg and Thomas Fynyan. Two shillings per day seems to be little enough, and one is inclined to marvel how they were able to " do themselves " on so small a sum, but it should be borne in mind that the purchasing power of money becomes less as the centuries advance, a fact which haws become patent to most of us during recent years.
                 
is an edifice of flint with stone dressings in the style of the 13th century.   It was erected at a cost of £5,000 defrayed by the Duchess of Norfolk and the Rev. William Wheeler. The Church was opened in August, 1875, and consists of nave and chancel with a Lady chapel on the north side.   The interior is replete with those accessories of worship required for the ornate and elaborate ritual of the Roman Communion. The Presbytery adjoining was completed in 1877. There is a small convent in West Street.    
                 
                  In the early days of Parliamentary representation the Members were chosen from among the townsmen themselves, and you will notice in glancing through the list, the names of many who have figured in the history of the town and who have been mentioned in previous pages. Later on, we find the names of Lewkenor, Covert, Shirley, Morley, Stapley, Springett, Fagge, Shelley, Bishopp, Goring, Burrell and Loder--Sussex families whose names are as household words to all who study the history of the County. Something will be said of most of these, as well as of those notable men who, although not natives of Sussex, were eminent public servants.
                             
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002