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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM       VICARS OF NEW SHOREHAM  
                         
September 4th, 1828, Zacharias Henry Biddulph. Second son of Rev. T. T. Biddulph, minister of St. James', Bristol, and brother of Rev. Theophilus Biddulph. Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxon., where he graduated B.A. 1813, and M.A. 1815, B.D. 1823.   Presented to the livings of Old and New Shoreham 1828, and to the Vicarage of Backwell, Somerset in 1831. Died, 21st November, 1842.   of the most interesting is that entitled "For James or George." This is a story of the Stuart Rebellion of 1745, wherein the adventures of the Young Pretender and his adherents on the march from Scotland to Derby, and the subsequent retreat to the North, are related in a very entertaining manner. The story first appeared in the pages of the Boys' Own Paper and was afterwards published in book form.   The Rev. H. C. Adams resigned his vicarage in 1897, when the livings of Old and New Shoreham were united, the then Vicar of New Shoreham taking charge of both parishes. The Rev. H. C. Adams died at Guildford and was buried in the Cemetery of that town.
May 19th, 1843, William Wheeler, B.D., Vicar of Old and New Shoreham. Old Shoreham Vicarage House was built during his Inciunbency and was afterwards the residence of his successors at Old Shoreham until the preferment of the late Vicar to Ashurst. A volume entitled " Sermon's preached in the Parish Churches of Old and New Shoreham, Sussex," by William Wheeler, B.D., Vicar, was published at Brighton in 1847, the preface is dated "Old Shoreham, Advent, 1846."   The Rev. William Wheeler was received into the Roman Catholic Church on Saturday-, December 17th, 1855, by Dr. Manning, the eminent Cardinal who was formerly Archdeacon of Chichester.  
               
      The Vicars of New Shoreham.    
               
  A document preserved at Magdalen College, dated 11th July, 1261, records the admission of " John the Chaplain " to the Vicarage of New Shoreham, and among other matters it is specified that he is to have " the house which Ralph the late Vicar had."
April 24th, 1856, James Bowling Mozley, B.D. A man of letters. Among other writings, he published in 1865, his Bampton Lectures, on "'Miracles," recognized as a valuable and important work.   It reached a fifth edition in 1880, and by some has been thought worthy of being numbered among the " Best Hundred Books." The Rev. J. B. Mozley took an active part. in favour of Mr. Gladstone, when he was elected M.P. for the University of Oxford, in 1847, and in 1869, when Prime Minister, Mr. Gladstone made him a Canon of Worcester which preferment was exchanged in 1871, for the position of Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford, and Canon of Christchurch.   1274, Robert.-1293, John de Grey.-Thomasde Renham, Vicar of the Church of New Shoreham figures in an Assize Roll of 29 Edward I. (1301) as having with Thomas Selide unjustly disseised Ralph Boltere and 'Maude, his wife, of their free tenement in New Shoreham. The Vicar pleaded that he entered the tenement in question only as tenant of a certain Reginald Kenewood and Hodiena his wife, and not by disseisen. Ralph and 'laud recovered seisin of the premises but were " in mercy " for a false claim against the Vicar.
  Ante 1356, Thomas.-John Avenell (1381) exchanged with Reginald Catigo, " Parson of Akeset " (Exceit, on the River Cuckmere). The latter only retained his benefice a very short time as in the same year Thomas de Bradfield exchanged the living with John Long, Vicar of Youngemonteney, in the Diocese of London who, 12th January, 1383-4, exchanged with Thomas de Kent, Chaplain of the Chantry of St. Katherine in the Church of Edburton, Sussex.   This was the Chantry which William de Northo had founded in the reign of Edward II., when he assigned certain lands and rents in Edburton, Southwick, New Shoreham, and Woodmancote, to a priest to celebrate divine service daily for ever in the Church of St. Andrew, Edburton " for the health of the souls of himself and Christine his wife, during their lives and after their deaths, and for the soul of Olyve, his former wife."
Dean Church calls Dr. 'lozley "after Mr. Newman, the most forcible and impressive of the Oxford writers," and as " having a mind of great and rare power, though only recognized for what he was, much later in life." He also speaks of " the sweetness, the affectionateness, the modesty and the generosity of Canon Mozley, behind an outside, that to strangers might seem impassive." A memorial to Canon Mozley and his wife is to be seen in the chancel at Old Shoreham.  
           
July 15th, 1878, Henry Cadwallader Adams. Boys of a generation ago delighted in reading stories from the pen of the Rev. H. C. Adams and his books are still read by the youth of to-day. Most of them deal with school-boy life, and perhaps one  
                         
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002