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        THE STORY OF SHOREHAM               VICARS OF OLD SHOREHAM  
                                           
was described as " Barrack Master of this place," which seems to bring Shoreham of a century ago curiously in touch with recent years.           of these has been preserved and bears in raised letters the names of Richard Herring and William Harfill, and the date 1677. A sundial on the south transept was placed there in 1813 by J. Edwards and T. Tate, Churchwardens.
The Rev. C. M. A. Tower, writing in the Parish Magazine, November, 1914, says : "The presence of soldiers, whether encamped or as old inhabitants have " heard say " in barracks in Shoreham is no new event.   Our Registers of just one hundred years ago betray the presence of West Essex Militia, 5th and 44th Regiment of Foot, 10th Battery of Artillery, 10th Dragoons, Marines, and others in Shoreham."   .   .          
                     
              The Vicars of Old Shoreham.  
                                           
                                Anciently, the Vicar of Old Shoreham, besides the vicarage house was entitled to receive all the tithes of grass, hemp, flax, wool, milk, lambs, calves, and pigs of the whole parish, and all the bread offered in the church. All other tithes and oblations were divided into three parts, of which the Prior and Monks of Sele took two and the Vicar one. The oblations made on the vigil and day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, were not included in this division but belonged wholly to the Prior and Monks.
A history of Brighton, dated 1824, mentions Military Barracks situated here at that time, " but," says the writer " not of great magnitude." They were in fact, situated on the site of Buckingham Gardens, and there was also-or had been previouslyan encampment on Ravenscroft, the land now occupied by the villas in Southdown Road and Ravens Road.        
    Picture  
The church tower contains a fine peal of eight bells, cast at Messrs. Mear's foundry in 1898, and were hung after the restoration of the tower itself in that year. They replaced six which had been in a defective condition for some years past. These older bells had been recast by voluntary subscription in 1767 by Lester & Pack, of Whitechapel, and two bore the inscription often found on the bells of that firm       Circa, 1150, Anfred, Priest of Sorham is mentioned-1190, Jocelin, Presbyter of Old Sorham. He had a dispute with the monks of Sele about the division of the tithes of the parish. It was finally agreed that for the future, instead of the usual division, there should be granted to the Vicar for the term of his life, a lease of the portion belonging to the monks, except the tithes of cheese, lambs, and wool of Erryngham, also 3s. paid from a mill and a like sum from the gabel of the lord of the same manor, for which he was to pay them 51 marks per annum.
                             
        " Our voices shall with joyful sound Make hills and valleys echo round."            
                             
  and the Tenor                     1242, Simon de Offenham-1249,William, Chaplain of Sorham1252, Sir Ralph Middleton, Vicar.-Florentius.-1263, Robert de Bletchington of whom frequent references are found in the Assize Rolls of the period, in one of which his predecessor Florentius is mentioned. Robert de Bletchington held two other benefices as well as that of Old Shoreham (Papal Letters).
      " In wedlock's bands all ye who join, With hands your hearts unite.              
        So shall our tuneful tongues combine To laud the nuptial rite."            
                             
  Number 5 bell was inscribed with the names of Thomas Poole, and John Butcher, Churchwardens.    
      Circa 1295-6, John de Brewose, who was doubtless of the family of the Lord of Bramber. He is described in an Assize Roll 23 and 24 Edward I., as "parson of the Church of Old Shoreham," and as making complaint that Edmund Earl of Cornwall, Gilbert de Mulsham and eight other persons had unjustly deprived him of a plot of ground containing 60ft. inlength and 31ft. inn width. The jurors said that " Gilbert and all the others except the Earl, unjustly disseised John de Brewose of the tenement he claims, therefore it is agreed that John recover possession
  Although the ascent is somewhat tiresome owing to the narrow stairway, the view from the summit of the tower is worth the climb for those who can endure it; but the parapet is a low one and care should be observed, especially on a windy day. From this point of vantage there is an extensive and pleasant prospect of sea and shore, and the town presents a certain quaintness of detail not otherwise obtained and perhaps not generally known.    
                 
    The choir was formerly roofed with cast lead slabs. One                
                                         
            194                            
                                    195    
                                         

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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002