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          THE CHANTRY  
                 
        exception to this rule), and sang their office at a particular chapel, altar, or part of the church other than the High Altar, specially set apart for the purpose. Thus Shakespeare represents King Henry V. as saying, in his prayer to the God of Battles, on the eve of Agincourt :    -
Picture  
        and I have built
     Sing still for Richard's soul.
           
  It appears from the returns made in the reign of Edward VI. that the income derived from the chantry in New Shoreham Church was more than that from the parsonage, and hence the vicar in times past had usually also filled the office of chantry priest. Thomas Mylles, "of the age of 70 years," was then incumbent, and the return further stated, " without the said chantry the cure cannot be well served."
  The chantry property included one toft with the close adjoining, and four acres of land in " le Millhouse " in New Shoreham, worth per annum 20s., also the profits of 18 acres " in Ledham quarter," 13 acres in the South field, 5 rods next Northbourne, 4 acres fresh marsh and 5 acres in Old Shoreham, in the tenure of John Shelder, worth 50s. The farm of eight acres in Southwick, and common of pasture for eight oxen, four cows and one horse in the common fields of New Shoreham, Old Shoreham and Southwick were worth 16s. 8d., making a total income of £4 6s. 8d. " The premises be letten by indenture bearing date the 6th day of May, 31st year of King Henry th'aythe (1539) unto Margaret Lewknor, widow, for the term of 40 years for the rent aforesaide." The profits of the parsonage were worth £3 6s. 8d.
  Some further information as to the chantry lands is to be found in the will of Owen Holmare, of New Shoreham, dated 3rd July, 1553, and proved 22nd November, 1555. Therein he says : " I bequeathe to Henry Wilson all my lands I purchased of Master Henry Polstede, Esq., belonging to the chantry of New Shoreham, lying and being in the parish of New Shoreham, Old Shoreham, and Southwick, willing him to give my brother Edward Holmare, £10. After the death of Henry Wilson, I bequeath the said premises to Owen Wilson, son of the said Henry, and his heirs for ever." The testator also made a bequest of his " bark and her apparel " to his three brothers, William, Thomas, and Edward Holmare.
           
                 
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002