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            ST. MARY DE HAURA    
                 
        was the Royal Duke with the compliment paid him, that he called the next day on Captain Roberts and afterwards went on board his packet, " amidst the acclamations of a vast concourse of the sons of Neptune." Captain Roberts, it may be added, had twice circumnavigated the world with Captain Cook, and in October, 1790, it was arranged that there should be another expedition to the South Seas for fresh discoveries and of this he was to have the sole command.
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  The Sailor King's successor, Queen Victoria (then Princess), when on visits to the Royal Pavilion at Brighton, was often seen passing through the town taking equestrian exercise. On several occasions while staying at Hove, King Edward motored through Shoreham, and once at least while on a journey westward, alighted from his car and took walking exercise on the Beach Green. The visits of His Majesty King George V., during the dark days of the war are detailed elsewhere in these pages.
           
    THE CHURCH OF ST. MARY DE HAURA OR ST. MARY OF THE HARBOUR, NEW SHOREHAM,  
           
  " The hoary grey church, whose story silence utters and age makes great," is the successor of an earlier building, erected on the same site presumably between the dates 1097 and 1103, and referred to by Philip de Braose in the deed by which he confirmed to the monks of Sele the right which they already had thereto.
           
  It is presumed that this earlier edifice gave place to another, erected about the year 1130, which is the date assigned to that portion of Norman work still remaining. The church as then built consisted of a nave of five bays-the greater part of which is now in ruin, although enough is standing to show the Norman details which graced it---? he present tower up to the first stage; then probably capped by a low pyramidal spire, as at Old Shoreham ; north and south transepts, which yet remain; and a chancel with semi-circular apse. Both transepts had apsidal chapels.
  Some time between the dates 1175-1210, the Norman chancel and transept chapels were removed to make room for a choir of five bays, and there is a tradition that this part of the church, which is exceedingly beautiful, owes its foundation to William 3e Braose who seems to have been somewhat of a bold, bad baron, before he turned his attention to church-building.
       
          William de Braose enjoyed the favour of Kings Henry II.,
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002