Previous Toc Next

      THE STORY OF SHOREHAM             THE CAPTAIN OF THE "DRAKE"  
                                   
    Richard, the younger, was educated in France and Spain, and was subsequently, for a. year and a half, lieutenant to Captain Thomas Plunkett in the " Discovery," a 400 ton ship of war, carrying 32 guns.   He was afterwards, for three years, Captain         only son and heir of Captain Richard Poole, of Sussex," and as " descended from a noble and very ancient family of that surname in Cheshire." The Grant was made from Dublin Castle by Roberts, Ulster King-at-Arms, in the year 1648, the coat being differenced in accordance with Richard Poole's profession. Azure, semee de lys or, a lion rampant guardant of the second, on a canton argent, a ship with her mainsail furled proper, and
                     
Picture    
        for his crest : on a helmet and
  Picture -   wreath of his colours, a mermaid proper, holding betwixt her hands a naval crown or,. mantled gules, doubled argent. In 1665, Richard Poole was appointed Captain of the "Drake," which was launched at Deptford in 1652-the third ship of war bearing that name -a ship which has had a long line of successors in the British Navy.   The 27th " Drake," a cruiser, launched at Pembroke in 1901, was torpedoed, October 2nd, 1917, off the north coast of Ireland.
       
  In the Admiralty records (Bill Office), under date 16th March, 1666, is a payment of £13 9s. 2d. " to Captain Richard Poole, Commander of His Majesty's ship the Drake,, for so much disbursed in prest
    and conduct money, and other charges in presting 83 men to serve his Majesty."
    While in command of this vessel, Richard Poole was remarkably successful in capturing a number of French ships in the Channel, immediately after the declaration of War against France and Holland; among them the "Frances " of Bordeaux, which he took in March, 1666, and brought into Shoreham Harbour.
  of two frigates of war, during which time "he did His Majesty (Charles I.) very good service against the Irish rebels, and ever behaved himself as best suited the quality of his commands."      
        We find no record of Captain Richard Poole's death, but from an Admiralty Bill, dated 30th October, 1678, it is apparent that he died some time between 15th April and 18th September in that
  In the Confirmation of Arms above referred to he is described as " Captain Richard Poole, second son of Mr. Thomas Poole,      
                                   
        172                   173    

Previous Toc Next

Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002