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            NOTEWORTHY FEATURES    
                     
        with hollow chamfer, chevron with pellets, beaked, cable with beads, studs, lozenge with rose, wheel-like studs, and billet mouldings. Nor should you fail to notice the portrait heads -said to be those of King Henry I. and his Queen-which adorn the north transept arch. The King has elaborately curled hair and beard.  
Picture    
  The Norman roof-beam is still in situ over the east arch of the nave.   It is ornamented with the alternate billet moulding in two rows. The church also contains " that very rare feature, a late 13th century rood-screen," having trefoiled arches and circular capitals and shafts. It is probably of the same date as the chancel itself, which seems to have been entirely rebuilt during that period, replacing the former Norman apse. The roof of chestnut also belongs to the same date and its tie-beams are often quoted as displaying the " dog's tooth " moulding, almost the only known instance of its occurrence in woodwork. To the late thirteenth century belongs the small low-side window in the south mall, although the outside jambs show stones bearing tool-marks from earlier work re-used. The rebate on the inside still retains one of the shutter hinge-hooks. The east and south windows of the chancel are graceful examples of the Early Decorated style. A trefoil-headed piscina and a four-centred arch of the fifteenth century-the latter probably for the Easter Sepulchre-will be noticed in the south wall.  
  Of the ruined chapel on the north side of the chancel very little remains, but a piscina sufficiently denotes its ancient purpose and the doorway which once gave access from the chancel to the chapel will also be noted. A modern vestry and the vault of the Bridger family now occupy the site.  
  The church was restored in 1340-41. According to the Gentleman's Magazine of that date, it was then in " a most lamentable condition."   The north transept was in ruin, the soil of the churchyard was raised so high as to conceal the walls to a height of several feet above the level of the interior and the jambs of the Norman doorway in the south transept (the principal entrance to-day) were quite concealed, the arch alone being visible. A small altar-bell was found when the earth was removed from the outside. The removal of the flooring under the singers' gallery disclosed the three memorial slabs to the Blaker family, now against the west wall of the nave.
       
          It is, perhaps, worthy of remark that the Decorated east  
                     
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002