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            Picture            
  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         MEN-OF-WAR -  
                       
" Vesuvius " (fireship, 269 tons, 8 guns), built 1693, and burnt in action at St. Malo, 19th November, in the same year.     .and fined three months pay. She was retaken in 1703, by the " Romney," but not again placed in the Navy.
" Sorlings " (5th rate, 362 tons, 32 guns), built 1694.   Took " San Salvador " (20 guns), in October, 1703, and was captured on the Dogger-Batik, 20th October, 1705, when in company with the " Pendennis " and the " Blackwall," two 44-gun ships, whose captains were killed. Captain William Coney of the " Sorlings " was tried by Court-martial, which not only acquitted. him but added that it " particularly approves and recommends his conduct." The ship was retaken in February, 1711, but was not again taken into the Navy.     " Newport " (6th rate, 244 tons, 24 guns), built 1695.   While on service in North America and commanded by Wentworth Paxton, taken by two French ships, 5th July, 1696, in the Bay of Fundy.
    " Orford " (6th rate, 249 tons, 24 guns), built 16955, and renamed " Newport " by Admiralty order, 3rd September, 1698. In the Cadiz Expedition of 1702.   Took part in the Battle of Malaga, 1704. Sold by, order of the Admiralty 29th July, 1714.
    " Fowey " (5th rate, 377 tons, 32 guns), built 1696.   Taken by a French Squadron off the Scillies, 1st August, 1704. "Feversham " (5th rate, 372 tons, 32 guns), built 1696. Wrecked off Cape Breton, 7th October, 1711, and her captain, Robert Paston, and most of the crew drowned.
             
" Terrible " (5th rate, 253 tons, 26 guns), built 1694. Captured by a French 36-gun ship, 20th September, 1710. Her captain, Thomas Mabbot, was tried by Court-martial, but was acquitted of blame.              
                       
" Penzance " (6th rate, 246 tons, 24 guns), built 1694. Served. on the Irish Station, 1697-8, and captured " Volland " (14 guns) in April, 1697. Her commander, John Aston, sold the ship's provisions and overcharged the men for clothes, for which offence he was tried in 1699.   The ship was sold by Admiralty order, 24th September, 1713.     " Gosport " (5th rate, 376 tons, 32 guns), built 1696. Taken 28th August, 1706, with 12 out of 15 merchantmen under convoy, by a squadron under Duguay Trouin. Her captain, Edward St. Lo, was acquitted and commended for his conduct on this occasion.
    " Lynn " (5th rate, 380 tons, 32 guns), built 1696. In May, 1712, while in company with the " Ludlow Castle," drove ashore and destroyed a Spanish 36-gun ship and three merchantmen in Estapona Roads. Sold by Admiralty order 11th June, 1713.
"Arundel " (5th rate, 378 tons, 32 guns), built 1695.   Commanded in 1710-11, by Andrew Douglas, a former captain of the "Dover." He had been, in the interval, captain of a fourthrate, but was dismissed the Navy for dishonesty, which the Court-martial characterised as "mean." He was restored in 1709. The " Arundel " was condemned in 1711, and sold by Admiralty order, 11th June, 1713.    
             
    The Lewes Town Records for the year 1694, inform us that '" a company of vagrant showmen were taken up by the constables and conveyed to a ship at Shoreham for the sea service."
"Hastings" (5th rate, 381 tons, 32 guns), built 1695. Wrecked off Waterford, 10th December, 1697, six men only being saved.       The New Shoreham Parish Registers record the burials, in 1695-6, of seamen belonging to H.M.S. " Dunwich," " Gosport," " Lynn," and " Feversham."
" Dunwich " (6th rate, 250 tons, 24 guns), built 1695.   After about nineteen years' service convoy and cruising at home and abroad, she was sunk as a breakwater at Plymouth Dock, 14th October, 1714.       In 1698, when the members of the Navy Board surveyed the South Coast, the Harbour was visited and inspected, but the report they made as to its condition was not very favourable. "Shoreham admits of nothing improvable," says the report, " the haven's mouth is a very dry barr upon the ebbs of spring tides and the outsea in foul weather throws up extraordinary quantities of beach in the manner of small islands, and whether you come in or goe out you meet with great difficulty and hazard, but ships of considerable burden are built and, waiting good seasons and proper care, they get theca into the sea."
" Falcon " (6th rate, 240 tons, 24 guns), built 1695.   Tho twelfth vessel in the Royal Navy to bear that name (the twenty-fourth "Falcon " was launched in 1899) ; her crew numbered 110 men. She was taken in 1695, by three 50-gun French ships off the Dodman. Her captain, Henry Middleton, was found guilty of an error of judgment in not running ashore      
                         
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002