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    THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         THE KING AND THE QUAKER  
                         
standing to the windward of the King, with whom he was chatting, so that Charles had the full benefit of the smoke from the pipe which the mariner was smoking. On being reproved by one of his mates for this familiarity, the man is said to have replied " a. cat may look at a king, surelie."   King had again " returned to his own." Richard Carver, who had been in the West Indies, came back to find a great number of his friends the quakers in prison. Some of the leading members of the Society of Friends entreated his sympathy, and, with him, obtained access to the King. Charles at once recognised him and enquired why he had not been to claim his reward before. He replied that he had been rewarded with the satisfaction of having saved His Majesty's life, " and now, Sir," said he, " I ask nothing for myself, but for my poor friends, that you should set them at liberty as I did you." The King offered to release any six, and we may imagine the sailor's blunt reply.   "What ! Six poor quakers for a King's ransom !"
Charles received important aid from the mate of the brig, Richard Carver, who was a quaker. He, too, recognised the King, but assured him that his life was quite safe in his hands. When they arrived, about 10 o'clock the"next morning, off Fecamp,  
               
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      The King is said to have been so pleased as to invite Carver to come again and ultimately ordered the release of the prisoners, but this would seem not to have been the case during Carver's lifetime, if we may judge from the evidence of a request which his widow, Mar *y• Carver, afterwards made to the King. In this document, which is preserved in the Record Office, Mary Carver reminds the King that her husband " carried over His Majesty in his great distress from near Shoreham into France at the risk of his life, when, by discovering him, he could have gained £1,000, and has desired no favour in return but the liberation of some of his friends, the quakers, which was not granted him."
      Possibly after this the quakers were liberated, and it is to be hoped that the King also " remembered the widow's poor estate." The name of Carver has been known at Shoreham for generations, and although Captain Tattersall's mate was a quaker, it is more than probable that his baptism as an infant is recorded in the New Shoreham Registers thus :-" Richard Carver, son of Derick Carver, bapt. 1 Jan., 1609."
      It is also recorded in some early Quaker Registers, relating to the meetings of quakers at Steyning, that " Joan Apps, of New Shoreham, widow, who died in 1696, "was of ye stock of ye Carvers, yt suffer matredum in Queen Mary's days."
               
he rowed him ashore and in shoal water carried him on his shoulders to the land.  
It had been a favourable voyage, but "they had noe sooner landed but the wind turned and a violent storm did arise in so much that the boatman was forced to cut his cable and lost his anchor." The brig then made for Poole, no one discovering that, she had been out of her course.   Joan Apps' house had been a place of meeting in 1676 and probably she was a near relation of the Richard Carver beforenamed-possibly his granddaughter-while the " matredum " mentioned refers to the burning of her ancestor, Derick Carver, in the High Street, Lewes, in 1557, during the Marian persecution.
Some eighteen years later King Charles and Richard Carver again met, but then under very different circumstances.   The            
                         
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002