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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         SHORTAGE OF CORN  
                   
morning of the 15th, were in sight of each other off Shoreham. The light air which was stirring came in from the sea. The French were outside and stretched for five miles along the offing. Having the advantage of the wind they could force an engagement if they pleased, and Lisle hourly expected that they would bear down upon him. Indeed, the French galleys came out, but the English were better provided. They had several large galliasses and "shallops with oars." One of the former, commanded by Admiral Tyrrell, of four hundred and fifty tons, was as swift as those of the enemy and more heavily armed. An indecisive battle lasted until the evening, when the French retreated behind their large ships and by that time the whole line had drifted down within a league of the English.   Admiral, Lisle cast anchor to show that he was ready for them if they cared to approach nearer. As darkness fell the enemy appeared to be imitating this example and a general action was confidently looked for in a few hours. A breeze, however, sprang up at midnight. As day broke, the space which they had occupied was vacant and the last vessel of the Fleet, of D'Annebault was hull down on the horizon in full sail for France. (Froude's Henry VIII.)     neighbourhood. The mayor and jurats of Rye were ordered to dispatch six of the biggest and most serviceable pieces of ordnance in that town to Shoreham, and Captain Temple " took order to hasten the work at Bramber and Shoreham by the Pioneers and Captain Fuller to man them when completed."
    Captain Temple was probably the same individual whom Chillingworth mentions in these terms :-" I visited a brave soldier of my acquaintance, Captain James Temple, who did that day defend the fort of Bramber against a bold daring enemy to the wonder of all the country, and I did not wonder at it, for he is a man that hath his head full of stratagems, his heart full of piety and valour and his hand as full of success as it is of dexterity."
             
                   
The proper defence of this country has been, and is, an ever present and important question. Not less so was it to our ancestors in the reign of Elizabeth, when an invasion by Spain was considered imminent.        
A survey of the coast of Sussex, taken in 1587 by the deputy-lieutenants of the county, makes certain recommendations for its defence, but the batteries would now be of little use against an enemy and give but small sense of security.        
Dealing with our own immediate neighbourhood the survey stated that " between Lancing beacons and Shoreham is a marsh and therefore needith but a small trench, flancked at the sayd beacons for small shotte." There were " two beacons on Cissbury Hill for signalling to Chanctonbury." Between Shoreham and Brighton there was " good landing, for defence of which two demiculverins and two sacres should be kept in some good house to be ready at. sudden and in sundrie places to be entrenched aptly for small shotte."        
The Civil War does not seem to have affected Shoreham very closely, but during the period 1624-31 there are references to the billeting of soldiers in Steyning, Tarring, Shoreham and the   We need give only a passing reference to the escape of Charles the Second from Shoreham Haven on October 15th, 1651. Here he terminated his six weeks of wandering after his defeat at
                   
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002