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    THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         D'ANNEBAULT ATTACKS  
                         
when large supplies were being sent over from England for the use of the garrisons after the recovery of Normandy by Henry V. We may note that, so far, the above is the latest reference to the village of Pende which has yet come to light. Its exact locality, though somewhat conjectural, was somewhere at the mouth of the river. Gradually- overwhelmed by the sea, before the middle of the fifteenth century it was totally washed away.     required to answer the charge of having plundered the ship of Diego de Astodyllos, and they were to be " deteigned in saulf custodie" until they should put in sufficient sureties, with bonds, to appear before the Council.
    In 1550, the merchants owning " a Britton vessel " which " gave travers " at Shoreham, complained, through the French Ambassador, to the Lords of the Council, asking for the restitution of the goods and " takling " which had been taken from the vessel to be restored to them, and again Lord de la Warr was directed to see that this was done, or otherwise, " if any refuse the delivery thereof upon due proffe to committe them to prison till they conforme themselves to the delivery of the same."
The Duke of Bourbon, one of the French nobles captured by Henry V. at the battle of Agincourt, and who had since been a prisoner in England, sailed from Shoreham to Dieppe in 1421. He was in the custody of Robert Poynings, who, for this service, was to receive 4s. a day for himself, 12d. a day each for 19 men-at-arms, and 6d. a day each for 40 archers. He was ordered to take as many ships as should be necessary to conduct the nobleman and this retinue to France, Shoreham being required to supply the transports.    
    When Gilbert Horsley, a pirate, seized two hoyes, laden with coals, belonging to Nicholas Arundel and John Russell, and brought them into Shoreham, they were claimed by the officers of the Earl of Surrey. The claim was disputed by a Commission appointed by the court of the Admiralty, which court decided that the Earl's claim to the hoyes " had no ground or collor in law and justice " and his officers, Cantrell and Dix, were required to deliver the two hoyes to Russell and Arundel and " thereof not to faile, as they will answer to the contrary at their perilles."
  In the following year licence was granted to Thomas Attehalle to convey- pilgrims in his ship the " Trinity," of Shoreham, to perform their devotions at the shrine of St. James Compostella, at Santiago, Spain. This was a profitable traffic during the fifteenth century, for the shrine was one of the most frequented in Europe. In the same year James Thomas, of Shoreham, was granted a licence to export grain, and William Curteis and Thomas Hoore were ordered to proceed to Brittany for the release of John Purfote, a prisoner.    
                There is a tradition that Shoreham suffered from the attack of the French during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and that, in one of their descents, they burnt part of the town. Aldrington, Hove, and Brighton also had a share of these unwelcome visits. In the summer of 1545 D'Annebault, the French Admiral, made a desultory attack on Seaford.   A landing was effected and the place pillaged and set on fire. The hardy Sussex Volunteers, roused by the smoke of the burning town, armed themselves and came down upon the French in swarms, destroyed their boats, and only a mere fraction of the invaders recovered the Fleet.
  In July, 1468, there was a commission to Richard West de la Warr, knight, and others, to enquire into the complaint of John Robbyn, of Abvilde, "subject of the King's brother, Charles, Duke of Burgundy." Robbyn had laden 250 quarters of wheat in a ship of Cornelius Johnson, of Vangoose, in Seeland, at Abvilde, to take to England or Flanders, but one "John Waynflete, with others of his retinue, in two balingers of England, came upon the ship thus laden, captured it and took it to Shoreham, contrary to the form of truce between the King and the Duke." De la Warr was to cause restitution to be made and to arrest and imprison the offenders.  
             
    Meanwhile the English Fleet, commanded by John Lisle, Henry the Eighth's Lord High Admiral, was greatly handicapped by weather conditions. August brought with it light easterly winds and calms and it became sultry beyond the ordinary heat of an English summer. The beer supplied to the fleet turned acid, fresh meat would not keep for two days, and the English Admiral was obliged to hang along the shore, where boats passing to and fro continually could furnish a succession of supplies. After a fortnight of ineffectual cruising, the two fleets, on the
  These acts of piracy were continued during the 16th century. A general letter from the Privy Council at Westminster, dated 1st December, 1545, addressed to " all justices, maiores, sherieves," orders the arrest of the " bodies, shipper and goods of John Burgess and John Gravesend, of Shoreham," who were            
                         
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002