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      THE STORY OF SHOREHAM       EDWARD THE FIRST AT SHOREHAM  
                     
  for the use of the King, " baskets of figs to the weight of 300 lbs., 50 baskets of dried grapes and 4,000 (? lbs.) Dates, and 1,000 (? lbs) of wax." This is interesting as showing the sort of merchandise which came into the port in those days.   Segwin and Ellis Barbe, two brothers, citizens of Bordeaux. Their vessel, laden with 116 tuns of wine, had suffered shipwreck near Shoreham. The wine was seized as wreck of the sea. "which ought not to be, because the captain, mariners and others in the ship came safely to land." The Sheriff of Sussex was directed to find into whose hands the wine had come and to make restitution to the owners. The law in such cases ,directed that, should anyone escape from a wreck alive, the ship should not be treated as lost and her cargo should not have ceased to belong to her owner.
  It was about the middle of the thirteenth century that a somewhat curious case of " invasion " occurred at Shoreham and is worth noting.   It arose from the following circumstances.  
  In the year 1251 a band of shepherds and peasants led by a Hungarian, who styled himself " Master of Hungary," rose in revolt in France. They were known as the " Pastoureaux," and their avowed objects were the reform of the abuses in the Church and the release of the Holy Land from Moslem rule. Tho outbreak, directed in the first place against priests and scholars, was accompanied by wild excesses but was soon suppressed, tho master being killed in an attack on the town of Bourges. One of the leaders, however, landed in England at Shoreham but was "cut to pieces." It would appear from this evidence that the town was not always a desirable place to " land at." We are not surprised to learn that this heresy, which is said to have been the greatest menace to the Church since the time of Mahomet, was so quickly suppressed when its followers met with such a warm reception as that given them by the inhabitants of Shoreham.  
    In 1289, the " St. Mary," a Bayonne ship laden with cloth, metal, and other goods, ran aground off Shoreham. Her crew, reaching land, made an agreement with the townsmen for 123 mark,, but it seems that they were not content with the receipt ,of this sum. They were later accused of stealing much of the cargo.
    A writ addressed to Shoreham in 1291, ordered the inhabitants to observe a truce with France. In March, 1301, and again in the following yoar, the town was ordered to join with other )ports in providing ships for the King's use. .
    In 1304, the " St. 'Mary " of Shoreham was engaged in a case of piracy on the high seas. Her master, Robert Alisaundre, in company with other pirate-ships from Yarmouth, Bristol, -a-rid the Isle of", ight, boarded a Seville ship while on her voyage from that city to England.   They plundered her of her cargo,doubtless a very valuable one, consisting of silks, fruit, oil, and wine : exports for which the city of Seville has been famous for many centuries-and even carried off her cordage and aachors, conveying the spoil to their various ports.
               
An order, dated 30th January, 1254, required the town to provide ships to convey Henry the Ill.'s Queen (Eleanor of Provence) and her suite to France. Four years later, Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, brother-in-law to Henry III., sailed from Shoreham for France. This was before the outbreak of open hostilities between the King and his barons. Henry was then on a visit to the French Court, and the Queen of France, hoping to bring about a reconciliation between the King of England and his powerful noble, arranged a meeting to take place between them. Before Earl Simon's arrival at the French Court, King Henry was " seized with a fever," possibly caused by the prospect of meeting his powerful relative. At all events, ho was not able to be " at home " to the Earl and so the meeting never took place. Shortly after this came the " appeal to the sword." In the conflict known as the " Barons' War " we note that Shoreham remained loyal to the King while the Cinque Ports ranged their forces on the side of the barons.  
  Edward I. and his Queen visited Shoreham June 21st, 1305, during a progress from Chichester to Canterbury. A payment of 20s. was made to Thomas do Weston for supplying grass for the use of the Queen's horses while in the town.   Possibly this was ,not the only visit which Edward I. had paid the town, for he had certainly been in the neighbourhood on former occasions.   He was at Bramber in 1285, 1297, and 1299, and at Bceding in 1302. In 1308, when Edward II. was making a levy of ships for the Scotch War the men of Shoreham were ordered " to prepare immediately a ship of that port with all armaments and appurtemances, and to choose and arm forty-two of the strongest :and most able-bodied men of the port, of whom one shall be master
    In November, 1257, there was an enquiry touching a ship of  
                     
        120            

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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002