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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM          
        REVENGE  
                   
hinder his flight to sanctuary.   The woman also confessed her share in the crime at Findon and both abjured the Realm. Probably this guilty pair embarked at Shoreham, and there, being no record to the contrary, it may be assumed that they crossed to the land of their exile in safety, but, apparently, pardoned criminals were not always so fortunate in " going        
  doubtless those who had suffered loss at the hands of the two pirates, seem to have embarked on the same ship and were concerned in the business of casting them overboard. They were subsequently charged with the murder of the two men. but on the supplication. of Richard, Earl of Arundel, they received pardon.
over " as you -,N ill presently see.                
        In the year 1353, two pirates, John Colet and Stephen Sherman, " plundered the king's men with. their ships and goods on the sea." They -were captured by some men of Shoreham and placed for safe keeping in the dungeons of Bramber Castle. It is evident that the treatment they received at the hands of their warders left something to be desired-possibly they were tortured in order to wring confession from them.   At all events we learn that " they escaped and fled to the church (of Bramber) for sanctuary " and afterwards received pardon on promising to abjure the Realm.        
Picture          
  As usual in such cases, the nearest port was assigned these men. In        
going towards it each would be required to carry a cross in his hand, to keep to the King's high-way, turning neither to the right nor to the left "until he be gone out of the land." The two pirates took passage at Shoreham but while crossing to Normandy " they were thrown out of the boat."        
Some half-dozen men, Laurence Absolon, Richard atte Hurn, William le Blake, Philip atte Hale, John Judde, and Harry Gower,        

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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002