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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM          
                 
and beat William Goldsmith, the owner, "so sorely" that forfear of him the latter fled the town.        
Questioned as to how he will acquit himself of the said trespass, John de Goringe says " he is in no way guilty," and. on this puts himself on the country. The jurors say on oath that " the day the county court was held, John de Goringe beat John Wodemer and wounded him in the middle of his arm with a knife, and injured William Goldsmith so that he fled the town;: and that the said John is a common brawler." John was committed to gaol but afterwards paid a fine for these transgressions, while certain of his fellow-townsmen became pledges for his future good behaviour.   Picture
In 1327 " certain persons broke open the chests and coffers, of William Vyvian at Shoreham, and finding therein £600, carried it away." Now this sum was probably money which had been collected as dues on merchandise brought into the port ;. William Vyvian having been appointed in 1324 and again in. 1325 and 1327 deputy for the King's chief butler " in the port of the town of Shoreham."  
Another case, which assumed somewhat serious proportions, occurred in 1330. Thomas de Weston was concerned with many others of the townsmen in an assault on Richard de Peshale,, knt.   He came to the house of the latter " with force and arms " and not only wounded and ill-treated the knight himself, but " took and carried away his goods and chattels to the value of £500, assaulted his men and servants and maltreated them so that for long he was without their services."  
The names of some of the " malefactors and breakers of the King's peace," concerned in this robbery and riot, occur with frequency in the records of the time. In several instances they are those of men who represented the town in Parliament !  
A commission of Oyer and Terminur,• in this matter, was issued.' to Richard de Wylughby, Philip de Ifeld, and William de Northou;: and those summoned to appear at Chichester in Pentecost week, 4 Edward III., on the plea of Richard de Peshale, were Thomas de Weston, John de Pevense and John, his son, German Hoblyt, Reginald le Cartere, Robert le Puffer, William and John Bernard,. Guy de Ely, John Ivory, Ralph Stacy, John de Beauchamp, Nicholas le Taverner and Elias le Taverner, Master John le Bulter,  
       
                 
* A commission granted by the Crown to "hear and determine" cases oii treason, felony, and trespass.        
                 
    106         107  

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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002