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          ASSAULT AND ROBBERY  
                 
        on his stall.   William, probably seeing what was coming and determined to " get his blow in first," the record tells us, " beat and knocked him to the ground and pressed his throat so that the blood flowed out of his nostrils."   Moreover he " took away a silver buckle to the value of 2s." and did other damage against Edmund, which the latter assessed at 20 marks.
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  When the case was tried at Lewes " William Baudefar comes and defends the injury and says that he wishes to know the truth." He stated that Edmund insulted him on the said day at Shoreham :market and "tried to strike him with a hatchet." He repulsed him but did not strike him nor take his buckle nor do him any harm, but only defended himself.   Both men " put themselves on the country " and the jurors said that " William insulted Edmund and hit him with his fist but did not take the buckle nor pressed his throat."   Therefore William was to satisfy Edmund his damage by the blow, which they put at half a mark, and was to remain in custody for transgression, while Edmund was "in mercy " for a false claim as to the buckle.
  The records of these cases of assault-sometimes accompanied by robbery-are numerous. One or two others which occurred during the Edwardian period may be mentioned.
  William le Irish or le Erisshe-the name is written both ways in the Rolls-had put up a paling to protect his ground from trespassers. His neighbour, Henry le Bourne, promptly " pulled it up and threw it on the ground and wounded and ill-treated " the owner who subsequently at the assize complained that he had damage to the value of £10.   "And Henry came," says the Assize Roll," and defended himself, and as to the assault, says he is not guilty.   As to pulling up the paling, he says he has a certain way to his grange in the town of Shoreham and William put the paling there to block up that way and that therefore he pulled it up and threw it down, without thereby doing any trespass."   And William says "he put up the paling on his own ground, the whole way," and reiterates that Henry acted against the peace.   The case was adjourned and meanwhile the two men seem to have settled their quarrel amicably as we learn further, that "afterwards the said William le Irish does not prosecute Henry le Bourne."
  The same Assize Roll records how John de Goringe " beat and wounded" John Wodemer, in the town of Shoreham, " at a county ,court held there "   He went also to a certain house in the town
       
                 
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002