Previous Toc Next

  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         THE MARLIPINS    
                   
                         
Hawise, late the wife of Roger de Veel, Richard Serle and Maud, his wife, Walter Burgess and Isabel, his wife, held at that date. Fourteen years later William Paynell granted to the Prior and canons of Herryngham (Hardham near Pulborough) on account of their poverty, " his manor of Cokeham and 32 acres of land in Lancing, together with a ferry (passagium) over the water of New Shoreham." It was stated that the ferry was then held of William de Braose by service of 4s. yearly, " de Braose holds of the King, and the said manor lands and ferry are worth £18 a year." In 1327 the profits were stated to be worth £20 per year. In return for the endowments made them by William Paynell the monks of Hardham were to find four secular chaplains to celebrate divine service daily in their church for the souls of the King, Edward II., and his progenitors, and for the souls of William Paynell and his ancestors " for ever."   to the loft above. Both cellar and loft have pointed windows. 'he window and door openings have no mouldings, only a plain chamfer to arch and jambs. On the Middle Street side the building shows evidence of somewhat rough repairing.  
  The original purpose for which the Marlipins was built is a matter of much uncertainty. It may have been erected to serve as a store for wool and hides, or for wines. There is no evidence to show that it was part of a Religious House and it certainly has nothing in common with a chantry.  
  Some years ago the writer, in searching the Calendars of Ancient Documents preserved in the Public Record Office, discovered that among them are several deeds relating to the Marlipins, which throw some light on its history.  
  The earliest is a grant by John le Pottere, of New Shoreham, to Juliana, late the wife of Reginald le Cartere, of the same, of a stone-built corner tenement called " Malduppinne," in the market place called " Otmarcat " (Oat Market) in New Shoreham, to hold for life, with remainder to Richard, her son. John Hemeri, bailiff of the town, was one of the witnesses to the grant, which is dated lst August, in the 20th year of the reign of Edward III. (1347).  
But the appointment of these secular chaplains led to unseemly daily strife in the Priory of Herryngham. In 1332 Matilda, daughter of John Paynell and heiress of William Paynell, while confirming the grant " of the passage over the river at New Shoreham " and the other endowments, seems to have deemed it a wise policy to allow the monks, for the future, to appoint four of their own order to celebrate the services. The unseemly quarrels which continually arose " on account of the difference of the rule of seculars and regulars " were thus to be avoided.    
              One hundred and thirty-two years later, that is to say, on the 31st August in the 18th year of Edward the Fourth's reign (1479), John Stempe, John Martyn and John Sharpe granted to Thomas atte Vanne, -of Suthampton," a stone-built corner tenement called " Malduppynne," in the market-place called " Cornmarket of New Shoreham, late of Robert Coleman, deceased, adjoining the garden called " Prede," John Cookson, bailiff, being one of the witnesses.  
The remarkable building, known as the " Marlipins," which stands in the High Street (the ancient highway to the ferry) has survived the changes of at least six hundred years. A venerable relic of the Middle Ages, it may claim to be one of the very few buildings remaining in this country or elsewhere in Europe, erected during the late 13th or early 14th century for, and devoted to, entirely secular purposes.      
               
    On the 8th September in the 4th year of the reign of Henry VII. (1489) John Sharpe the elder, of New Shoreham, husbandman, granted the building to Thomas Dymoeke, of Suthampton, merchant.   It was then described as " a cellar with a chamber or loft above it," called " Malappynnys " in New Shoreham between the street called " Moderlove Strete " and a garden of the Lord of the said town, and another street called " Procession
Its time-worn appearance never fails to arrest the attention of the most casual observer, and many conjectures as to its origin and former uses have from time to time been put forward. Some have supposed that it was part of one of the Religious establishments previously dealt with, while others have vaguely referred to it as " a chantry.'    
    Strete.
It is built of Caen stone and knapped flints in chequered squares. On the south side, fronting to the High Street, pointed door-openings give access to the cellar, which is, however, very little below the level of the street, and to the stairs leading     Three years later, Thomas Dymocke, of Suthampton, merchant, granted the building to Richard Benjamin of Lewes. In this Deed it is described as " a cellar with a chamber or loft (camera sive lofta) over it," in New Shoreham, called " Malappynnys,"
                         
    91             95      

Previous Toc Next

Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002