Previous Toc Next

  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM              
                     
the master of St. James of Shoreham, Ralph, son of Agnes, and Robert Deth, to recover two acres of land " in Suwyk " (Southwick) which she claimed in dower against them. The defendants did not appear at Lewes and judgment was given that the property should be taken into the King's hands, but they were summoned to appear on St. Hilary's day, three weeks later, at Winchester.            
    CHAPTER VIII.  
           
  THE ANCIENT FERRY-THE " 1~IARLIPINS "-FORGOTTEN STREET' NAMES-OLD-TIME TRADERS-CUSTODY OF THE " COC%ET"-WOOL. TRADE-" OWLERS.'
The Brothers of the Hospital of the Blessed James, in the Borough of New Shoreham, contributed to the subsidy levied in 1296, and again in 1327, and John Borle and Richard Jay, mentioned above, left small bequests to it. Nothing further is known of this Religious House until 1574, when its site and buildings were granted to John and William Mersh, of London. Whether this is the Hospital mentioned in the Valor Ecclesiasticus of 1535, or whether the reference is to that of St. Katherine is not clear. A faint echo of its former existence in the town is to be found in the will of Walter Farley of New Shoreham, mariner, dated 30th June, 1628. " Being sick in body, I make my will and desire to be buried in the church of New Shoreham. I bequeath to my wife all my household stuff and a tenement of cellars called Hie Cakge, and a croft called St. James, containing 3 roods of land, for her life, and after her death to my brother, John Farley and his heirs for ever ; if he die without heirs then the same to the heirs of my cousin, John Farley, of Benham Bridge ( ?Bineham Bridge) and Thomas Farley of the same."  
           
  The ancient ferry at Shoreham, approached from the west end of the High Street, crossed the river to the Lancing side. It was entirely distinct from the ferry at Old Shoreham mentioned in previous pages, nor must it be confused with the modern ferry to the beach, which had no existence in the Middle Ages.
  It is mentioned in a Charter which King John granted to the burgesses of Shoreham in the year 1209, when they paid the King 30 marks " to have their town at farm for £70 " and also " to have their ferry during the King's pleasure, so that no horse above the value of three marks, nor any dog, nor any unknown messenger, burgess or merchant, shall have passage without the King's writ and unless they swear that they are carrying no message except it be to the honour of the King."
           
            Somewhat later William Bernehus, of Cokeham, gave to the monks of Lewes Priory " the right of paying nothing at the passage of Shoreham beyond the harbour, provided the person really belongs to the Priory." For this concession he was promised a perpetual anniversary to his honour.
            It is evident that the right of these monks to a free passage across the river to the Lancing side was sometimes disputed. This is disclosed in a case tried at Lewes " in the morrow of All Souls, 33 Henry III." (1249), when Roger de Hyda was summoned to answer the Prior of Lewes in a plea " that he permit him-the Prior and his men-to have free passage over the water of Shoreham in the boat of the said Roger free of freightage as he has always been wont to have." This privilege had been granted, so the Prior maintained, and as noted above, by William de Bernehus, father of Agnes (the former wife of Roger de Hyda), whose heir she was, and he produced the deed under which de Bernehus had made the grant to his Priory. " Nevertheless," said the Prior, " Roger demanded freightage for the ferry," whereby he had suffered damage to the value of 40s.
                     
    90                
                91    

Previous Toc Next

Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002