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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         RELIGIOUS HOSPITALS  
                           
Hyde of " Iryngham," and Isabel, his wife, to grant a messuage with appurtenances adjoining the dwelling-house of the Prior and Friars in New Shoreham to enlarge their dwelling-house.   a refuge, the college leasing to them the house, chapel, and four acres of land. They appear to have been, at the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the poorest of all the Sussex Friars, against none of whom, we are told, could charges of luxury be levelled.   When the Bishop of Dover came, in July 1538, to the White Friars of Sele he " found neither Friar nor secular, but the doers cpen there was none to serve God and had not been for some time."
A few years later the Carmelites appear to have enlarged their church, as in 1368 Sir Michael de Poynings left them £20 for that purpose. Small bequests were also made to them by John Borle in 1373 and William Laxman in 1374.  
Ralph Double, citizen and fishmonger of London, whose will was proved 29th March, 1392, in addition to other bequests, left to " the Prior and Convent of Friars of New Shoreham " 6s. 8d. to celebrate for his soul and for the souls of his parents and brothers and others. This testator also left £15 for a chaplain to celebrate for his soul in New Shoreham Church, 6s. 8d. to the Vicar for the same purpose and 6s. 8d. to the church fabric.   One of the witnesses to this will was Thomas Brydham, " Vicar of New Schorham." Robert Rede, Bishop of Chichester, left the Carmelites a small bequest in 1414.   The only recorded names of the Priors of Shoreham are :Nicholas de Bedynge, in 1329; Nicholas, in 1342 (possibly the same individual) ; John Bromlee, before 1383, and John Crawle, in 1414. It is recorded that in 1438 Brother John Bolney was ordained a Deacon of the Convent of Shoreham, in Boxgrove Church.
          The Hospital of St. Katherine of Shoreham is known from its occurrence in the Subsidy Roll of 1327 and in several mediaeval wills. Margaret Covert, in 1366, John Borle, rector of West Tarring, in 1373, and Andrew
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In addition to the property already mentioned the Carmelites owned three roods of land " in the meadow of Burstall," given them by Richard Stapleton. Early deeds relating to this describe its situation as " near the land of Amicia de Wayte," and as running from that belonging to the Templars to the water's edge. Robert de Lindon gave them a meadow adjoining this land.      
      Peverell, in 1375, left small bequests to it, and the will of Richard Jay, of Crawley, 1466, mentions " the almspeople of the hospital of St. Kateryn." It probably survived the religious changes of the Reformation by abandoning its patroness and becoming " the Hospital of Our Saviour, Jesus Christ," from the fact that much prominence is given to St. Katherine's
This southern part of the town was too unprotected from the encroachments of the sea to suffer any other fate than complete ruin. By the year 1493 the sea had made such overwhelming inroads that it threatened to sweep away the little that remained of the Carmelite Priory and eventually it disappeared beneath the waves.   The waters of the Adur now flow over the site of the church and conventual buildings. The shingle-bank, heaped up after the sea had overwhelmed much of the town and destroyed several streets, covers up part of the Priory lands.      
         
  emblem on the sixteenth century seal, by which alone the existence of a Hospital of St. Saviour at Shoreham is known. If this conjecture is correct the reconstituted Hospital was no doubt " the spytyll " at Shoreham to which Henry Marshall, Vicar of Wilmington, left 20 pence in 1550.
Driven out from their home the Friars were obliged to seek another asylum. They migrated to the Priory of Sele. As it bad belonged to the Abbey of St. Florent it had reverted to the Crown at the suppression of Alien Priories in 1450, and nine years later was annexed to Magdalen College, Oxford, by Bishop Waynfleet. In 1493 it was tenantless and here the Carmelites from Shoreham, whose house "was not only falling into decay but in danger of being entirely washed away by the sea," found  
  The seal just referred to is a pointed oval.   Our Lord on the Cross on a mount between two trees of peculiar form, in base, a Catherine wheel. Legend:-" The sele of O' Saviour Jesus Christ of the 'ospital of Shoram in Sussex."
  Very little is known of the Hospital of St. James. It was in existence in 1249, when, at an Assize held at Lewes, " Letitia, who was the wife of Ralph Beaufz," brought an action against
                           
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002