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              GIFTS TO RELIGIOUS HOUSES  
                     
            Among other gifts to Roligious Houses may be noted that of Matilda, the wife of John de Beauchamp. Early in the reign of Henry III. she " gave and confirmed to the Prior and Canons of Calceto (near Arundel) all the rents which they had received from Bernard de Hagia, her husband's father." In addition " the plain with a messuage thereupon of which he became possessed in the town of Shoreham, by marriage with her mother, Matilda." These gifts were made for the express purpose of providing a lamp to burn constantly before the altar of St. Mary,
  CHAPTER VI1    
           
GRANTS To ANCIENT RELIGIOUS HOUSES-KNIGHTS HOSPITALLERS AND TEMPLARS-CARMELITE PRIORY-ITS GRADUAL RUIN BY THE SIIA -HOSPITALS OF ST. CATHERINE, ST. SAVIOUR, AND ST. JAMES.  
           
MENTION has been made of the founding of the Priory of Selo by William de Braose and of the property with which he endowed it. The same baron also made considerable grants to the great Abbey of Battle which William the Conqueror had founded on the site of his triumphant victory over the last of the Saxon kings.  
  in the Church of Calceto, as a perpetual alms.The remains of this Priory of Calceto stand on the left-hand side of the road leading from Worthing to Arundel in a small enclosure at the foot of " Causeway Hill," the descent which leads down to the lowlands of the river Arun.
  About the middle of the thirteenth century William of Arundel, son of Edward King, " for the salvation of the souls of his father and mother and all his ancestors," gave three shops in the town of Shoreham to St. Mary's Hospital at Chichester. They were described as " adjoining the house of Robert the Minter on the south side and extending to the corner."
De Braose granted to the Abbey " 8 messuages in the Borough of Bramber in the Rape of the same name in Sussex, and three others in Sorham, and one hide of land in Sorham to be held for ever without molestation." He also gave the Abbot and monks, annually, 400 bushels of salt and 10 bushels of wine, which the Abbot of Fecamp paid him yearly for a certain land of his which he   held   called   " Wurmincgeherste "   (Warminghurst,   near Steyning), near Lenglentune.   In like manner he freely gave for one of his knights, named Haseline, another hide of land called " Herincgeham " (Erringham).   At the same time another of his knights, named Ralph, the son of Theodore, with his consent and confirmation, gave another 400 bushels of salt to the Abbey. Tetbert, one of the tenants of William de Braose, " influenced by the example of such benevolence and piety, earnestly desired to become a monk and devoutely dedicated himself to the Abbey." With the assent and confirmation of his Lord, he gave with himself the lands which he possessed, viz., 1 hide at Lenglentune in Heregrave, called " Wulfran's hide " in " free and eternal possession."  
  Some reference has already been made to the former existence of Religious Houses in Shoreham. The Knights Hospitallers and Knights Templars had a contemporary existence in the town.There is ample proof that the establishments of both these Orders were situated on land south of the present High Street, but long since swallowed up by the sea, before the shinglebank was formed and the river forced to take its present eastward course.   The Adur, therefore, runs over the site of the conventual buildings and the shingle-bank covers up much of the land with which both Hospitallers and Templars were endowed.
  The Knights Hospitallers were founded in the year 1113, but the exact date when they acquired land at Shoreham cannot be ascertained. The first reference to their existence in the town is found in the Cottonian MS. (Nero E VI.) in the British Museum. It tells us that " William de Braose (probably the grandson of the first William) confirmed to the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in frank almoigne all the land which William Trenchenote held at Shoreham and the tolls and pontage and all customs and exactions which should come to the said William or his heirs from his goods and chattels at Shoreham for the good of the souls of the said William, his father and mother."
All these gifts Philip de Braose, son of William, confirmed in his father's presence. The latter, in accordance with the liberties and royal dignities of Battle Abbey, granted that the burgesses whom he had given with their houses " should have full possession to buy and sell within their houses without molestation and without toll, except on market-days when wares were publicly exposed."  
                     
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002