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      THE STORY OF SHOREHAM               THE BEACH  
                                 
roomy bungalows which have been formed by placing two carriages in parallel position a few feet apart, building a saloon in the space between them and a verandah at either end. But they are not all so composed and a more picturesque and permanent type is now in fashion.     sea-coast town. Some bear the titles of well-known nursery stories, pantomime and light opera.
    It is curious to note that visitors to Bungalow Town often refer to Shoreham itself as " the village." " I am going over to the village," you will sometimes hear them say. Others, who seem to have a somewhat hazy notion of the geography of the district, will refer to Bungalow Town as " the island."
                   
    Picture       Although included in the Shoreham area for purposes of civil government, Bungalow Town is wholly in the parish of Lancing, and a chapel-of-ease erected some years ago is dedicated to " the Good Shepherd."
          In spite of the fact that a large and populous town is quickly covering the beach many beautiful wild flowers still flourish in abundance, one of the gayest being the yellow-headed poppy.
          At high tide, in genial weather, the passage across the river to and from Bungalow Town by ferry-boat is a pleasant experience. At low tide it is otherwise. You may then almost, -but not quite-walk over and there is a ford for horses and carts. At high tide the Adur presents the appearance of a fine lake. At low tide she trickles through a waste of mud.
          The foot-bridge, opened with appropriate ceremony February 3rd, 1921, by Earl Winterton, Member for the Horsham and Worthing Parliamentary Division, is a great convenience to Shoreham and Bungalow Town. It brings up the number of bridges now crossing the Adur at Shoreham to four and is already justifying its existence. Our aged townsman, Mr. Thomas Stow, present at the opening of this latest bridge, saw the Norfolk Bridge opened in the year 1833.
                       
                                 
  The names which have been given to these bungalows are as varied and as fanciful as the styles of building. Some, very appropriately, have reference to the marine surroundings, others bear the names of flowers, some of Sussex hills and villages or of places far distant.   A few suggest the repose of a seaside resort as yet not quite spoilt by the noise and bustle of the modern                
                                 
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002