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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         OLD HOUSES    
                         
Baronets, and these notables headed a procession to the new bridge, where the Duke performed the opening ceremony. A luncheon followed.   The Lion and Horse surmounting the arches carrying the chains upon which the bridge is suspended represent the crests of the noble Duke whose name it bears. In the words of the Press at the date of opening-`` an elegant structure, reflecting much credit both on the architect and builder."   The property adjoining to the north is " Lladloes " and is so named in the title deeds, but the origin of such name is lost.  
            " Bank House," on the opposite side of the street, though altered and adapted to the requirements of modern business premises, retains some features of interest. Several of the rooms, originally forming one very spacious apartment, are  
                         
Of Inns, the most famous in former times was the Star. It was an old coaching house and the premises extended from the corner of Church Street (Star Lane) to, and including, the site now occupied by Eade's Stores. Its sign formerly was suspended over the High Street by means of two uprights and a cross-beam, from which it hung high above the traffic which passed under it. In more recent years the premises have served as an ordinary public-house, and as such are now closed.   The Dolphin Chambers was formerly an Inn, but the successor of a still older Dolphin. Part only of the ancient Fountain Inn, adjoining the Old Ship-yard, remains. Until superseded by the modern Bridge Inn this house of entertainment had been known to travellers for generations.   The "Old George Inn" stood practically on the site of the Primitive Methodist Church. A King's Arms, possibly the present day King's Head, and a Ship are both mentioned in the 10th year of George I. The White Lion (the arms borne by the de Mowbray family, anciently Lords of Shoreham) gave name to White Lion Street, now West Street.                
  Picture
           
An examination of the interior of many of the houses in New Shoreham reveals an antiquity not always apparent from a glance at the outside. Many have been refronted and in some cases " post and panel " work has been plastered over. Low entrances and ground-floors much below the level of the street, stout oak beams and chimney-corners-the latter adapted to modern requirements-bespeak the antiquity of the homes of many of the townspeople.  
               
    panelled from floor to ceiling. These panels were formerly decorated with paintings, now unfortunately obliterated by one uniform colour. In the deed of conveyance the premises are described as " formerly in the several tenures of James Mitchell, William Stevens, Hugh Roberts, Sir Ralph Moore, Widow Muggridge, Charles Annington " and others.
A very ancient tenement, in which the business of harness making and saddlery is carried on still remains in East Street. It shows unmistakable signs of extreme old age. An examination of the interior will lead to the assumption that it has been standing not less than four hundred years and it is not at all unlikely that, in the distant past, it was a farmstead.                
    It may be of interest to note that the present vicarage house was formerly known as " Cupola House," so called from the
                         
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002