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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM             TRADE TOKENS        
                                     
The original Charter, granted by James I., to hold a weekly market on Tuesdays, is preserved at the Town Hall. It is inscribed on a sheet of vellum, ornamented with a portrait of King James. and some floral work and has the Great Seat of England attached. This Charter was granted at the suit of Thomas, Earl of Arundel, to his uncles, Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, and Lord William Howard, conceding them full licence to hold a market in the town of New Shoreham every Tuesday and to take all tolls arising therefrom. It is dated June 9th, 1608. The Earl of Arundel, at whose suit the Charter was granted, being at the time a minor, probably accounts for the grant itself being conveyed to his uncles.The document provides also for a Court of Piepowder to be held on market-days.   This name is a corruption of the court of piedpoudre (curia pedis pulverizati) said to be so called from the dusty feet of most of the suitors who frequented the court, although, perhaps, a more satisfactory derivation is pied puldreaux or the court of the pedlars. It was a court wherein the steward of the owner of the market or fair was judge, with power to, administer justice for all commercial injuries or disputes, transacted at the gathering of trades, and on all commercial complaints its authority was absolute.   An offender might be taken, a jury of similar trades empanelled on the spot. evidence heard at once, and the offender commence his punishment all within an hour.                          
  Why this building was removed in the year 1823, to make room for its successor, which is described as having been " a mean building of brick," we are not able to say.  
  The annual fair held at Shoreham is within the memory of the present generation. It took place on the 25th July (St. James" Day) and the stalls were arranged in the -Market-place-on the Custom-house Stones and the south side of the High StreetIt was discontinued about 30 years ago, having then dwindled to a mere collection of toys and pedlary-a ghost of its former self.  
  The tradesman's half-penny token issued in the 17th century has on the obverse " Richard Glyd of New " and a griffin in the field. The reverse has " Shoram in Sussex " and the letters G./R.A. in the field.  
                         
      Picture       Picture    
        The Shoreham Shilling.      
                         
In later years Saturday became the market-day and is so noted in a Gazetteer of 1770 and in Bailey's British Directory of 1784. There was also a corn market every alternate Monday.                            
      The very beautiful shilling token issued by Clayton and Hyde in 1811 shows a view of the church. In June, 1920, two of these " Shoreham shillings " were sold by auction in London for £3 10s. The firm named carried on business in the premises at the south-west corner of John Street, afterwards Tillstone's, and more recently Ayling's.
According to De Foe, the original Market House, " an antient and very strong building, was blown flat to the ground " in the great storm of 27th November, 1703, and at the same time, he tells us, " all the town shattered."                            
Some years later a new Market House was erected at the expense of Sir Nathaniel Gould, Member for the Borough. This building is described as having consisted of " an oblong canopy of freestone, embellished with gothic ornaments, supported by ten columns " and is said to have been a fine piece of architecture. It stood almost in the centre of the town, immediately in front of the present Crown and Anchor.Two of its columns yet remain in use as lamp-posts, one at each extremity of the ancient. Market-place. It is almost needless to state that neither are, in situ, although not far removed from their original position     An important event in the history of the town was the building of the Suspension Bridge to carry the main coast road over the Adur. It was designed by W. Tierney Clarke, the architect of Hammersmith and Marlow Bridges, and the masonry work performed by W. Ranger of Brighton.Itwas opened May 1st, 1833, with an appropriate ceremony. Old Shoreham Bridge having been locked up by the High Constable of Shoreham, the keys were delivered to the Duke of Norfolk. His Grace wast accompanied by the Earl and Countess of Surrey, the Duke and Duchess of St. Albans, Sir C. F. Goring and Sir James Lloyd"
                         
                                     
    74                   75            

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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002