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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM          
                 
District Council of 15 members. By a Local Government Board order which came into operation October 1st, 1910, New Shoreham extended her boundaries and was re-named Shoreham-by-Sea. The Urban District comprises the town of New Shoreham, Old Shoreham, Kingston-by-Sea, and the greater part of Bungalow Town, and has been divided into North, South, Marine, and Kingston-by-Sea Wards.        
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The following gentlemen have held the office of Chairman of the Urban District Council :-W. H. Harker, 1894-1901 ; C. Howard, 1901-2 ; H. Reeks, 1902-3 and 1905-6 ; T. B. Gates, 1903-5; E. R. Harmsworth, 1906-7; A. Chubb, 1907-8; S. Gregory-Taylor, 1908-9; Ellman Brown, 1909-11 ; H. G. Evershed, 1911-13; A. Eade, 1913-15; MW. L. Cook, 1915-17 ; A. Chapman, 1917-18; ;W. P. Glazebrook, 1918-21 ; SW. Gregory Taylor, 1921W.  
The Custom House, being no longer required for that purpose, was leased to the Local Government Board for a Town Hall, and was opened on Lady Day, 1890, by Sir Henry Fletcher, Member for the Parliamentary Division of Lewes. It has recently been purchased by the town from the Hooper family. The building which formerly served as a Town Hall, in East Street, is now part of St. Mart's Hall.  
The important part which fairs played in the life of a town during the Middle Ages and later is well known. In the reign of King John (1202) a fair lasting eight days was established at Shoreham.   In 1220 a fourth part of the fairs held in the town was granted by John de Braose to Sele Priory. At the beginning of Edward the First's reign we learn that William de Braose possessed the town and port of Shoreham, with toll and other lawful customs thereto belonging. At that time there was a free market on Wednesdays and Saturdays and a fair of two days at the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross (September 14th) " at which he takes his accustomed tolls and assize of bread and ale."   The Lord of Bramber also possessed the rights over the seacoast and fishery by his mariners of Shoreham, "from Beauchef (Beachey Head) as far as the Isle of Wight and to the middle of the sea."  
It is probable that these early markets and fairs fell into abeyance with the decay of the town during the 15th century, but as it began again to be a. little more prosperous about the beginning of the 17th century the need of a market again became apparent.  
       
                 
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002