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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM              
                     
may appear, some hundreds of people from the surrounding district visited this gruesome exhibition. A dog, recognising in the exposed face that of his master, would not leave the coffin. So the man was identified as one, John O'Hara, and was buried in the Churchyard.            
    CHAPTER VI.  
           
            NEW SHOREHAM-THE MANOR AND THE TOWN-DE BRAOSE AND DE MOWBRAY FAMILIES-FORMER AND PRESENT GOVERNMENT OF THE TOWN-FAIRS AND MARKETS-MARKET HOUSES-SUSPENSION BRIDGE -INNS-OLD HOUSES-PLACE-NAMES-BUNGALOW TOWN.
                     
            THE Manor of New Shoreham belonged to the Lords of Bramber and so followed the same line of descent as that Barony, being held successively by nine of the de Braose family.
            In 1316 William de Braose (the last of that name), holding his manors of the King in chief as of his crown by knight's service, granted the manors of Knappe, Shorham, Horsham, Beaubusson, and Bramber, and 3,000 acres of wood in Bramber, to Richard Haclut and William Moigne, with remainder to John de Mowbray and Alina his wife, daughter and heiress of William de Braose, and their issue. De Braose retained a life-interest.
            John de Mowbray above mentioned was the founder of the Carmelite Priory at Shoreham. During the reign of Edward II. he joined with other nobles against the Despensers. The plot to overthrow these notorious favourites of the King failed. Sir John was beheaded at York (1322) and his wife and son imprisoned in the Tower. " Alina, late wife of Sir John de Mowbray," was compelled by order of the King to grant the estates to Hugh Despenser the younger, Earl of Winchester.
            In 1324 there was a grant for life to William de Braose of £70 yearly by the hands of the Sheriffs of London " out of the farm of the city in return for the castle and manor of Bramber and the town of Shorham, which he has granted to the King for that term."
                     
            After the death of William de Braose an Inquisition was taken at Steyning (1326), and it was found that he "late held the castle and manor of Brembre, with the town of Shorham, for life, as part of the Barony of Brembre as of the heritage of Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester, as appeared by a fine levied between Alina, who was the wife of John de Mowbray and Hugh, Earl of Winchester. And the castle and manor of Brembre he (William) demised to the King for the term of the life of the said
                     
                6s    
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002