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      THE STORY OF SHOREHAM             BUCKINGHAM HOUSE  
                                   
His widow, " whose most tender and affectionate care inducing her to a personal attendance in London on the education of the two heiresses of this most antient family, dyed there of the small pox, January, 1722, aged 39."       There was another rebuilding, or very considerable alteration, after 1782, as the " ruin " of the late Buckingham House bears witness, although there are evidences that portions of the more ancient house were incorporated in it.
      It will be noted that the road from Brighton to Shoreham formerly ran quite close to Buckingham House, as shown in the picture. Its course may still be traced in front of Little Buckingham out to " Cockeroost."
                   
  Picture     Some years ago, the family of Bridger retired to Adur Lodge, where they still reside, the present head of the family
              being Lieut.-Col. Bridger, Deputy Lord Lieutenant of the County of Sussex.
      Picture  
               
        Buckingham then became the residence of Henry Head, Esq., whose connection with the town of Shoreham will long be remembered. This gentleman interested himself in every good work for the welfare of the inhabitants and was beloved and esteemed by all. He died at Buck. ingham House on July 1st, 1905, at the age of 70, and memorials to his memory, to his widow and four
             
        BRIDGER.   of his sons will be found in the
    Picture   chancel at Old Shoreham. One son was a victim of the ill-fated "Titanic" and one was killed in action in Gallipoli in 1915.
             
              After Mr. Head's decease Bucking
                  ham was without a tenant for several years, but ultimately it passed by purchase into the possession of W. G. Little, Esq.,
                 
                  the present owner, who built a new mansion in the park somewhat to the north of the old.
                 
                 
                  The former house was the scene of a tragedy during the 'fifties. A series of robberies occurred in the neighbourhood and culminated in one at Buckingham. The robber, attempting to escape by a window, was shot by one of the men-servants, wounded, and afterwards found dead in the park. The body, in a coffin with a glass lid exposing the face to view for purpose of identification, was placed in an out-house at the Red Lion Inn. Strange as it
    The illustration of the east front of Buckingham House (from the original water-colour in the British Museum) shows it as it appeared in the year 1782. It would seem to be of somewhat later date than that referred to in Edward Blaker's deed of 1657 as then " newly erected," but possibly it had been added to.  
     
                       
                                   
        66                     67    

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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002