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    THE STORY OF SHOREHAM                 BLAKER, AND MONK FAMILIES  
                                             
In the reign of Edward VI. (i.e., 1550-1) the Manor of Buckingham was quit-claimed to Thomas West, Lord La Warrand others against Richard Lewknor, * gent. Edward Lewknor, when admitted to the Inner Temple in 1603, was described as " of Buckingham," and in 1606 the widow of one of the Lewknors held the mansion of Sir John Gage.             county of Sussex, Esq., as a testimony of her never dyeing affection, bath paid her last tribute in this monument." Dorothy Blaker's " never dyeing affection " for her first husband did not prevent her from entering a second time into the bonds of matrimony. She remarried, 9th April, 1681, at Kingston -Bowsey, Robert Hall, of Old Shoreham, son of Robert Hall of Rye, and found a last resting-place February 4th, 1683-4, in the north cloister of Westminster Abbey.   Her second husband was also buried there 8th November, 1690.
                             
Edward Blaker, who was living in 1645 and died October, 1653, is described in the memorial to his widow, Susannah, in Old Shoreham Church, as of Buckingham.            
He was succeeded by his son Edward, who possessed the manor and estate and was Sheriff of Sussex in 1657 and M.P. for New                     After Edward Blaker's decease, the property devolved (subject to his widow's interests) on his brother William Blaker, who was Sheriff of Sussex in 1684 and died 6th October, 1703. He was buried at Old Shoreham. By his first wife, Ann, he had an only daughter, Susannah, the wife of John Monk, of KingstonBowsey (Member for New Shoreham in the Parliament summoned to meet at Westminster, 22nd January, 1688-9, and dissolved 6th February following). He died in 1701 and his wife in 1690 and both were buried at Kingston.
            Picture    
          Shoreham from 1658 to 1678.                
  Picture     By a deed, dated 11th July, 1657, Edward Blaker, therein described as of Old Shoreham, gent, in consideration of the love which he bore to Dorothy, his wife, and for further jointure in case she should outlive him, granted to her "the manor house called Buckingham House," which he had newly erected, with              
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      the dovehouses, barns, stables, gaterooms, courts and appurtenances and the closes called Northfield, Newfield, Eastfield, Tenne Acres and Southfield, all which were parcel of the farm called Buckingham Farm, and all other              
                        Their son, William Monk, married Hannah, one of the daughters of Stephen Stringer, of Goudhurst, in Kent. The mother of this lady was an Austen, and it may be noted in passing that Jane Austen, the gifted novelist, was a descendant of the same family. By his will, William
BLAKER. ARMS.--4rgent, a chevron ermine, between three blackamoors' heads in profile couped proper. CREST.- A horse's head .sable, bridled and maned or.                    
          ARMS-Gules, a chevron. azure, between three lion's heads erased argent, langued.  
                   
  lands in Old Shoreham in his tenure. Edward Blaker, of course, rebuilt on the site of an older house which went by the name of Buckingham.         CREST.- A dragon volant.  
                   
          Blaker devised his property to his grandson, William Monk.
          The memorials to William and Hannah Monk, in Old Shoreham Church are interesting. He died May 2nd, 1714, at the early age of 29, and his epitaph records his " principles of honour and justice, laid concealed by reason of his early fate, tho' long since implanted and which shone out so gloriously in one of his illustrious family," that he was " generally beloved and esteemed while he lived and lamented by all at his death, but especially by his loving consort Hannah . . . by whom he left issue, Jane, Barbara and John, which last died in the 3rd year of his age and lies in the same vault With his father."
  The memorial to this gentleman in Old Shoreham Church informs us that "his piety, loyalty, charity, humility and sweetness of disposition engaged the love and admiration of all that knew him in his life and noe less their lamentation at his death," and that " he exchanged this life for a better, 13th September, 1678, in ye 49 year of his age, whose sorrowful relict, Dorothy, ye daughter of Henry Goreing of Heydown in this        
                           
  * Old Shoreham Registers record the burial of Richard Lewknor, August 28th, 1570.                        
                                             
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002