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                THE WILL OF JOHN COBYE    
                         
              1363 John atte Hyde of Iryngham and Isabel, his wife, gave certain property in New Shoreham to the Carmelite Friars who had settled in the town. The Hydes held Iryngham as well as certain lands and tenements in New Shoreham, of Sir John de Mowbray (of Bramber) by Knight's service and John is again mentioned as " of Iryngham " in 1372. The names of Walter Walkstede, clerk, and Richard Sonde and Pauline, his wife, appear in a document relating to Iryngham, which is dated 1411.
  CHAPTER IV.      
             
OLD ERRINGHAM-HELD OF KING EDWARD THE CONFESSOR-EARLY RECORDS-WILL OF JOHN COBYE-BELLINGHAM FAMILY-THE OLD MANOR HOUSE-THE CHAPEL-A RESTLESS SPIRIT-NEW ERRINGHAM HOUSE-AN OLD COACH ROAD    
               
                         
APPROACHED by means of an ancient track-way leading out of the old road from Shoreham over the Downs to Beeding is Old Erringham. It may also be reached from the river valley by way of the road, which takes one up through Erringham Shaw, where the trees cling to the steep sides of what we may reasonably believe to be ancient sea-cliffs of the Adur estuary. All along the eastern side of the river valley, from Old Shoreham northwards o the Shaw, the slope of the Downs is very abrupt and in some parts almost precipitous.   Picture  
The Saxon Fredri held the Manor of Erringham of King Edward the Confessor and it was then assessed for five hides and worth 40 shillings. Fredri, being a free man, " could betake himself whither he pleased," such is the quaint wording of Domesday Book, and the same record also informs us that at the time of William the Conqueror's great Survey (1086) William de Braose held the manor, but it was then assessed for half a hide and its value had fallen to 20 shillings. There were two villeins and five bordars on the manor " who have nothing."    
References to this place are found among the records from the 13th century onwards. In 1259 Adam Rymund was admitted to bail from the King's prison at Bramber "for the death of John, son of Celea de Erringham." In 1328, among the lands and tenements of Adam de Bavent, it was stated that "at Erringham there is a certain messuage and 64 acres of arable land, pasture for sheep and rents due at the Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, and at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist," and the whole yearly value was said to be 104s. 1d.    
               
    The will of John Cobye of Iryngham, in the parish of Old Shoreham, Co. Sussex, dated 6th September, 1541, and proved 20th November, 1544, is preserved at Somerset House. He bequeaths " to the mother church of Chichester 12d. and to the high altar of the church of Old Shoreham, 8d." To his wife, Isabel, £40, " and one half my household stuff if she occupy her lands herself, she to have corn enough to sow her lands, also sheep to lay her leage."   Remembering the faithfulness of one of his servants he directs that his executors " shall keep old Nyman during his lifetime." After bequests to his children,
By a deed, dated London, 1st July, 1344, Roger Bavent, Knt., granted to King Edward III. his manor of " Iryngham " and in 1351 it is referred to as being reserved for the uses of the King's chamber. In 1358 it was granted to Peter de Braose, and in    
               
                         
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002