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  THE STORY OF SHOREBAM              
        ANCIENT LITIGATION  
                     
11 acres of land in Old and New Shoreham which were held by Robert Tregol, who said that she had demised the land to him for a term of three years " to hold according to a certain deed made between them." The Sheriff was ordered to value the 71 acres " and the chattels found in the same " and this being done, it was ordered that Robert Tregol should have the value of the crops on the land and that John should recover possession.   of Nicholas, her former husband. In defence, Robert de Blechington said that he purchased the land from Nicholas le Taylur, who had bought it from a certain William Forceaus, and judgment was against Maud for a false claim. Maud was certainly most unfortunate in her litigation.
  At another time we find Robert de Blechington disputing with Ralph de Anyngdon (Annington) as to the possession of three acres of land in Old Shoreham, claimed by Ralph as his lay fee, against which the parson said that " a certain Florentius, his predecessor, was seised of the land as of the right of his church of Old Shoreham, but it was alienated from him."
Yet another case records that Maud, " who was the wife of Nicholas le Taylur," held 5s. 6d. rent, with appurtenances, in Old Shoreham, and of this the Baudefars sought to recover possession_ Maud, while admitting that the property in question had belonged to William, father of John Baudefar, said that he, " long before his death," demised the same to Nicholas le Taylur, her former husband, for 16 years, within which time Nicholas died and bequeathed the said term to Maud and she now claimed nothing except by reason of that term which she said was " not yet past." She also produced the deed of William Baudefar witnessing the demise to Nicholas for the term of 16 years, but her contention that the period had not expired would not hold water. " On reckoning," so runs the Assize Roll, " it is found the term is complete and past and John shall recover possession."  
  Again, theVicar appears as debtor to Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, who was Lord of the Manor of Old Shoreham at this time. The debt was 100s., which he agreed to pay " at Michaelmas next," and if he does not he grants that the Sheriff shall distrain his lands and goods. Moreover he found pledges-Master William de la Folde of Goringes and Simon Scherington, who acknowledge themselves the principal debtors (? to Robert de Blechington) and grant that if Robert does not pay the Earl at the time named the Sheriff may then distrain on their goods.
           
One more case may be mentioned in connection with the property of the Baudefar family, but in this Richard, who figures in connection with the two water-mills in Old Shoreham in 52 Henry III., again appears. Richard's father, John Baudefar, had given to Adam de Horton and his issue six acres of marsh in Old Shoreham, but with the understanding that if Adam died without issue, the same should revert to John Baudefar and his heirs, quit of the other heirs of Adam.   Adam died without issue and it appears that his brother William took possession. On the case being tried the jurors said on oath that William de Horton had made a false claim and was therefore in mercy but was pardoned by the justices because of his poverty. William de Horton was described as a " chaplain " and at this time the six acres of marsh were in the tenancy of Robert de Blechington before mentioned.            
                     
This Vicar of Old Shoreham continually appears in the Assize Rolls of the period. For instance, the same "Maud who was the wife of Nicholas le Taylur " made a claim in 16 Edward I. for 2 1/2 acres of land, with appurtenances, in Old Shoreham, in which she said the Vicar had no right or " entry " except as the tenant            
                     
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002