Previous Toc Next

  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM          
             
men of all towns and villages who were capable of bearing arms were required to practise shooting on every Feast day or suffer the fine of a half-penny. The cultivated lands on the Downs are known as " Laines," and other place-names not elsewhere referred to are Anchor Bottom and Crooked Moon.        
  Picture
Richard Budgen's Map of Sussex, dated 1724, shows two windmills on Mill Hill. One which stood there within living memory was destroyed by fire about thirty years since. From a circumstance to be noted later Mill Hill is sometimes called " Good Friday Hill."  
We find a reference to three mills-a windmill and two watermills-all situated in Old Shoreham, in a " Fine," dated St. Andrew's Day, Lewes, in the 14th year of Henry III. (1230). It sets forth that Henry de Sco Walerico on the one side, came to an arrangement with Thomas Scot and Cicely, his wife, and Agnes " de Veteri Shorham " on the other side, with reference to six acres of land in Old Shoreham. In the result, Henry granted to the first two one acre of land, " being that acre where the windmill is situated, together with the windmill itself and its appurtenances," and two acres of land " which adjoin in the field to the east of the said ville against the sewer outside on the south and one croft which adjoins the messuage of the parson of the said ville on the west . . . to be held by the said Thomas and Cicely, paying two shillings in four terms, viz.: at the Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, 6d. ; at the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 6d. ; at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, 6d., and at the Feast of St. Michael, 6d. for all service. All the remainder of the six acres of land, with two water-mills in the said ville and everything pertaining thereto, to remain to Henry and his heirs." He also remits to the other three persons all arrears of rent for the mills which he could have claimed up to the date of the agreement.  
While making no attempt to indicate the exact position of the windmill it seems quite evident that it was near the village. Possibly the croft is identical with the small meadow which the inhabitants now refer to as " the crawt," in the immediate neighbourhood of which the windmill was probably situated.  
It is quite reasonable to believe that the water-mills were situated in the hollow at Little Buckingham, where the farm buildings now stand.   We will go even further and claim that the western of the two cottages was anciently one of the actual  
       
44     45  
       

Previous Toc Next

Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002