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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM          
                 
            Picture
the ferry-man rowing over, a soldier followed on horseback behind the boat. " So," says the diarist, " we rode over and landed at Old Shoreham." The two travellers put up at the " Star " at New Shoreham, " the best though poor," and were lodged two beds in one room. " Some fellows drinking under us and singing disturbed us much, and bad beds, and we forced to go through kitchen where they were, to bed."  
           
The Act of Parliament, passed 1781, for building the timber bridge at Old Shoreham, stated that the ancient ferry was dangerous and provided £20 yearly rent of the ferry to the owner, Charles, Earl of Surrey, his heirs or assigns. The Act authorised £5,000 to be raised in shares of £100 by way of annuity, the income arising from the tolls, falling to the Duke of Norfolk on the death of the annuitants. The bridge was ten months in building and was considered at the time of its completion a marvel of engineering skill. It has a total length of 500ft. with 27 openings, the roadway is 12ft. wide with two recesses, 70ft. by 24ft., for passing vehicles.   It is connected with the Lancing side of the river by a causeway built on faggots sunk into the morass, which formerly extended to the Sussex Pad.   This old bridge-one of the most picturesque features of the Adur Valleyis now the property of the Railway Company, having been acquired by them at the time the line was extended to Horsham. It has recently undergone a necessary and careful restoration.  
The Manor of Old Shoreham-vested in the Crown as part of the Duchy of Cornwall-was purchased by Charles, Duke of Norfolk, from George IV., when Prince of Wales.  
The acceptance of the stewardship of this manor, being an office held under the Crown, formerly vacated a seat in Parliament. Most of the thatched cottages are of considerable antiquity and give the village much of its venerable appearance. Those in Malt House Lane are especially worthy of notice. The fine old Court Cupboard shown in our picture is in a cottage in Old Shoreham Street. It was in this cottage, or the one adjoining, that a former local celebrity, blind Fanny Winton, lived for many years, bearing her affliction with cheerfulness and Christian resignation.  
It may be of interest to note that the fields situated north and south of the highway running from the cross roads to Old Shoreham village are known as the Upper and Lower " Butts." It may be that the name is an echo of the fifteenth century when  
                 
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002