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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM       THE FERRY  
                     
crossing at this point before the timber bridge was built. It was quite distinct from the ferry at New Shoreham already mentioned.   saide Earle doe see hold end enjoy the same we nee nott, end upon our survey we find by credible information that the said fferry is parcell of the Manor of Old Shoreham, neither hathe ye Earle any land lying on either side of the said river (nor neere ye same) and therefore we return the fferry to be in ye possession of the Honoble ye Trustees."
           
In a survey of the time of James I. it was stated that " the Earl of Arundel, or the ferry-man, his Trent, usurps the landing of passengers upon the Prince's lend et Old Shoreham end therefore it is fit he should have a rent according to the value of the moiety of the ferry, viz., £10 per annum."  
  In 1652 John Urlin purchased the manor with all its rights and appurtenances, including the passage over the water, " commonly called Old Shoreham Ferry," and ell rights of hunting, hawking, fowling and fishing in the manor.
           
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In the Parliamentary Survey of 1651 the manor was described as " parcell of ye revenue of Charles Stuart, late Prince of Wales, as pert of ye late Dutchie of Cornwall." Mention is made of the quit-rent due to the Lord of the Manor from " a certaine ffarme or messuage celled `Court Farm,"' in the parish of Old Shoreham, and also " all that fferry and passage over the river commonly known by the name of Old Shoreham fferry, which leadeth from the town of Old Shoreham toward Arundel."   The river was sometimes fordable by horsemen but apparently this custom was attended with a certain amount of risk.
  Dr. Burton, journeying to Findon in 1751, and arriving at Old Shoreham, says: " as the passage over the river did not look either convenient or free from danger, we turned to the right end traversing the country rather upward sought the security of the bridge " (at Bramber).
  In 1772 Mr. John Baker, of Horsham, describes in his diary how he, with a companion, travelled from Arundel through Broadwater, Sompting, and Lancing to Shoreham ferry, and how
At that time the Earl of Arundel claimed the profits of the ferry, " but by what right or title," said the surveyors, " ye  
                     
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002