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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM              
                     
situation that support for the occupant could be relied on from the travellers to and fro. It follows then that a line of anchorages implies a well-frequented road at the period at which they existed. The road in question from Kingston doubtless took much the same direction as the present Middle Road, crossed the Ham Field, and came out into the Buckingham Lane about opposite Mill Lane.            
    CHAPTER III.  
           
  OLD SHOREHAM-A ROYAL MANOR-HELD BY PRINCES OF WALES - SHOREHAM MARSH - THE FERRY - THE TIMBER BRIDGE - PICTURESQUE COTTAGES-FORMER WATER-MILLS AND WIND-MILLSANCIENT LITIGATION.
The third road from the east was, of course, the main Old Shoreham Road from Brighton and Lewes. It is likely that this was a Roman road. Its Shoreham end has been diverted in modern times further south to make a more direct approach to Old Shoreham Bridge, the original alignment having lain across the lower slope of Slonk Hill and Buckingham Park, through Little Buckingham Farm to Cockeroost, with a turn down at Old Shoreham.  
           
  THE homesteads of the Saxon community at Shoreham on the left bank of the Adur mainly centred near the Church of St. Nicholas (patron saint of mariners) in much the same position as the cottages of to-day. In the time of King Edward the Confessor, Azor was the great man of the place and "held Soresham of the King," while Fredri held the neighbouring Manor of Erringham. If any habitations were then in existence further southward (the nucleus of the later town) they were all included in " Soresham," the home or dwelling place on the shore.
           
                     
This is, no doubt, the road to which reference is made in two Assize Rolls of the reigns of Henry III. and Edward I. The former records that, on the day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, 1265, Alexander de Pevense and Alan the Blowere, with arms and strength, assaulted Robert Oter of Lewes, pulled him from his horse, wounded and maltreated him, broke his left leg and robbed him. This took place " in the King's way between Shoreham and Lewes."            
  William the Conqueror's Great Survey, Domesday Book, completed in 1086, informs us that in the time of Edward the Confessor " Soresham was assessed for 12 hides," but when the survey was made, "for five hides and half a virgate." There was land for 15 ploughs. On the demesne were three ploughs and 26 villeins (persons in absolute servitude) and 49 bordars (cottagers) with 12 ploughs. There was a church, six acres of meadow, and woodland yielding (support for) 40 swine. In the time of King Edward the manor was worth 25 pounds, and afterwards 16 pounds. At the time the survey was made the value was stated to be 35 pounds, " and yet," says Domesday Book, " it was (formerly) farmed for 50 pounds, but that could not be borne."
           
The latter Roll records that in 1280 a murder had been committed and the body, that of an unknown man, was found in the neighbourhood of Hangleton " in the King's way between Shoreham and Lewes."  
Having given this short sketch of the varying fortunes of the place, you are invited to review the History and Antiquities of Old and New Shoreham in a more detailed manner.  
                     
            " William (de Braose) himself holds Soresham " we are informed by the same ancient chronicle quoted above. It was part of that great baron's share of the spoils of conquest and included in his grant of the Rape of Bramber.   His descendants continued to hold it until the reign of King John, but the then Lord of Bramber, another William de Braose (of whom more will be related in future pages) falling into disfavour with the King, John seized his estates, and although the greater part was afterwards restored to the family on the payment of 9,000 marks, the Manor of Old Shoreham remained in possession of the Crown for many generations.
                     
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002