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  THE STORY OF SHOREHAM         OLD ROADS INTO THE TOWN    
                     
destruction of the haven would seem to have lasted throughout, most of the 16th century.   gone along Mill Lane. Though this way is associated, to our modern ears, with a windmill which stood there and has been removed only in recent years, it is probable that the name is much older and originally referred to the water-mill in New Shoreham Parish, over the weir of which it would pass on its way to the hills and Old Shoreham. A reason for thinking that
But a better state of things was at hand. In the early years of the 17th century the inhabitants seemed to have awakened to the fact that, although the original haven was now quite useless, the projecting shingle-bank along outside the coast-line proper had made the river itself available as a harbour. Advantage was taken of the new formation to transfer the shipbuilding and harbour works to the south of the town and this step inaugurated a new era of prosperity, the "river at the back of the town " being finally abandoned.  
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The ship-building principally carried out well on into the 17th century was by Robert Tranekmore, whose yards were near the west end of the High Street on the south side. Hereabouts stood the "Fountain Inn."* The carved oak chimney-piece, removed from this house and now fixed in the Town Hall, has upon it a carving of the Arms of the Shipwrights' Company and it is not unlikely that Tranckmore was a member of that body and that he had the Arms carved and placed in what was possibly his own residence. The Arms were granted to the Company in 1605 and this approximately fixes the date of the carving-or rather corresponds with the probable date of it and with Tranckmore's occupancy of the house.      
One or two other points in the plan of mediaeval Shoreham may be touched upon. The two Hospitals are shown on roads forming entrances into the town from the east.   Institutions of this character were generally so placed and although there may be no definite historical reference to the actual sites the voice of tradition is not silent.      
As to the question of roads leading to the town, it would appear that, in addition to the highway already alluded to as nearer the coast and conducting to the ferry, there was probably another road leading from Brighton past Aldrington, Southwick, and Kingston Churches to Shoreham. Reaching the latter it divided, the branch on the right or upper side ascending to Old Shoreham and the hills, the other turning down into New Shoreham on the left. The first-named branch would have      
           
  a mediaeval road ran past the three churches named is that at two of them-Aldrington and Kingston-there were anchorites' cells. Now the occupants of such places were built into their domiciles and being unable to get out to procure for themselves the necessaries of subsistence, were dependent on the charity of passers-by. As a consequence the Bishops of those times would not licence an " anchorage " unless it happened to be in such a
           
* The reader is referred to the flap of the Town at the end of book.   It is not claimed that the 14th century existence of all the Inns shown can be guaranteed, or that the names of the various plots of land in the Town can be proved mediaeval.   At the same time there is nothing improbable in the theory-place-names usually go back a surprising way.  
           
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Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved
Revised 27 February 2002